Local News

  • Third Houston brother a mystery

    Clyde Houston had two sons, Leon and Rocky, according to his obituary. However, Cleveland attorney James Logan said in a court filing that Clyde also had a son named Tommy.
    “Diligent inquiry has been made of family members and persons within the community,” Logan wrote. “Research has not revealed the address of potential heir Tommy Houston.”
    Clyde was a former Roane County commissioner who lived in Ten Mile. He passed away on March 14, 2012.


    A story on a holdup at a Kingston pharmacy in the Jan. 21 edition of the Roane County News listed the value of drugs taken at more than $50,000. A pharmacist there said police were likely looking at the street value of the narcotics from Kinser Drugs, but the retail value was more like $5,000.

  • Meth lab in jail parking lot

    Showing up at the Roane County Jail in Kingston to bail someone out wasn’t the issue. The problem was having meth-making components in the vehicle.
    According to a Roane County Sheriff’s Office report, that’s what Kevin Anthony Ray admitted to on Jan. 26. He was charged with manufacturing a controlled substance.
    Third Street between Loveliss and Cumberland was shut down while Ray and two other occupants in the vehicle were decontaminated.
    The Dodge Durango he was driving was quarantined and taken to an impound lot.

  • Houston appeal critical to case

    The U.S. government used a state conviction as a basis for filing firearms charges against Rocky Houston. The legal process has yet to run its course on that state conviction, however.
    Rocky was found guilty in Roane County Criminal Court in 2010 for reckless endangerment and felony evading arrest.
    He now faces 14 counts of being a convicted felon in possession of firearms in U.S. District Court.
    Rocky appealed his state convictions with the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals.

  • Rockwood to meet on sewer upgrades

    Rockwood City Council will meet Thursday at 4 p.m. to approve resolutions regarding more than $1.4 million in Rural Development loan money to complete upgrades at the wastewater treatment plant.
    The upgrades are required under a Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation director’s order.
    “This goes back to the same project we have talked about more than a year now. We are just waiting on jumping through these last hoops,” said manager Kim Ramsey, who inherited the aging system’s problems from previous management.

  • Morgan slip-fall lawsuit settled

    Roane County Property Assessor David Morgan settled his slip-and-fall lawsuit.
    He sued the Villages of Center Farm L.P., claiming it was responsible for an ankle injury he suffered in 2006. 
    The case was set for trial in Roane County Circuit Court on Jan. 24, but it settled on Jan. 23.
    Terms were not disclosed, but Morgan owes $7 in court costs.
    In the lawsuit, Morgan alleged that he fell from a curb when he was taking out his trash because a street light wasn’t working.

  • RSCC has help for human resources pros

    Human resources professionals who want to review before taking the Professional in Human Resources or Senior Professional in Human Resources certification exams can take advantage of a class at Roane State Community College’s Oak Ridge campus.
    The college’s Office of Community Outreach and Professional Training is presenting a course that utilizes the SHRM Learning System, the most widely used tool available to prepare for the certification exams. The class will be Thursdays, 6-9 p.m., from Feb. 7-April 25 at the Oak Ridge campus, 701 Briarcliff Ave.

  • Black History Month show at RSCC

    “Lift Every Voice,” a one-act play that tells the story and influence of the Harlem Renaissance, will be held at Roane State Community College’s Roane County campus on Wednesday, Feb. 6.
    Performances will be held in the O’Brien Theatre at 12:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.
    The WordPlayers, a nonprofit theatre company, will perform “Lift Every Voice” as part of Black History Month. The 50-minute play features drama, song and dance.

  • DA says no proof of theft in bar death

    Witnesses reported seeing someone go through David Harvey’s pockets as he either lay dying or dead in the parking lot of a bar outside Harriman.

    No one, however, has been charged with theft or robbery, and that’s not gone over well with Harvey’s family.

    “We’ve talked to the family,” District Attorney General Russell Johnson said. “The family wants us to charge theft or robbery, but we can’t prove anything was taken.”

    Harvey, 46, died outside the Grill & Pub on July 23, 2011.

  • More meth labs seized in Roane over the last year

    Meth labs continue to proliferate in Roane County, despite state laws passed in recent years that were supposed to curb the problem.

    “We’ve dealt with more labs than we care to deal with, but they’re there and we got to deal with them,” Roane County Sheriff’s Office Chief Deputy Tim Phillips said.

    Kristin Helm, a public information officer for the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, said complete statistics for 2012 were not available.