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Local News

  • NO MORE ‘ACHY BREAKY HEART’

    For Christopher Forrester nothing is more joyful than music.

    So when the teen, who suffers from Down syndrome, lost his expansive collection of CDs he was devastated.

    The family was heading to church one Sunday when the collection was accidentally left on top of the family car.

    “He lost 150 CDs or so,” said Forrester’s mother, Sarah Brown. “My neighbor said that morning he tried to holler at us and tell us it was on the car.”

    “I thought he might grieve himself,” worried Brown.

  • Pay, not Ruppe, objection in city administrator vote

    The two Rockwood City Council members who voted down Becky Ruppe as city administrator don’t have a problem with her filling that role.

    Ruppe is already doing those duties anyway, they said.

    Instead, council members Peggy Evans and Mike Freeman took issue with the proposed jump in pay for the position. That’s because they contend other city employees have not seen such an increase.

    “In fact, I don’t care if he wants her as city administrator,” said Evans, of Mayor James Watts’ desire to see Ruppe in the role.

  • Investigation underway into Friday death

     

    Roane County authorities were looking into the death of a 76-year-old man on Friday. Fred Cooper was found unresponsive in his yard at 112 Leffew Drive south of Rockwood. “Hard to tell anything right now,” Sheriff Jack Stockton said about the investigation, which was being handled at press time by Sheriff’s Detective Greg Scalf and the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation.

  • Relay up to ‘Finish Fight’

    Roane County’s Relay for Life is still fighting the fight to end cancer.

    This year’s theme is “Finish the Fight,” and the annual nightlong fundraising walking event for the American Cancer Society will begin at 6 p.m. April 25 at Roane State Community College.

    “Our goal is to get more people involved, both people to have teams — like maybe if they have somebody in the family that passed who had cancer or somebody that is a survivor,” Co-Chairwoman Lori Wright said.

  • Kentucky HeadHunters to ‘Walk Softly on This Heart of Mine’ in Harriman

     

  • Double trouble, exploding trailer

    A month before he is scheduled to stand trial for voluntary manslaughter, Eric Glenn Gallaher’s legal problems have grown.

    The 33-year-old Harriman man was indicted on Feb. 18 for allegedly selling cocaine in a school zone. His twin brother, Derek Lynn Gallaher, is a co-defendant in the case.

    Eric Gallaher turned himself in at the Roane County Jail Thursday morning.

  • Harriman ponders need for future tax hikes

    A public hearing about changes to Harriman’s City Charter to create a city manager form of government turned more into an impromptu discussion of what the city needs and the tax increase that would be required to do it.

    Harriman Mayor Chris Mason has said the city will someday need to raise taxes, but has thus far avoided it.

    He talked tax increase again when talking with community members about the city’s needs.

  • Rockwood mayor seeks Ruppe promotion

    Rockwood City Council defeated an effort to name Ruppe municipal administrator in addition to her role as city recorder.

    Mayor James Watts said he will be bringing it up again for passage.

    “She’s very deserving of the position,” Watts said. “My whole purpose is trying to get everything done before I get out of office in November and have everything ready for the next administration when they come in.”

  • Slow permit results in gas station fine

    The Food City Gas N’ Go in Harriman was fined $250 by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.

    The gas station was constructed in 2011. A construction permit application for the gas station wasn’t submitted to TDEC until Sept. 5, 2013.

    “On Oct. 11, 2013, the division issued a notice of violation to the respondent for constructing an air contaminant source without first obtaining a valid permit,” the TDEC order said.

  • Looseleaf Laureate: It’s almost time for winter to release us

    I’m going to confess the obvious — I’ve been one poor correspondent this winter. Forgive me. We’ve all had to drag ourselves through this unusual spell of bleakness. It’s been hard for me to talk about it.

    Now we’re on that wild East Tennessee-weather roller coaster ride to spring again.