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Local News

  • Going shopping at Teachers Supply Closet
  • Harriman employees get 2-percent raise

    Harriman city employees will be seeing the benefits of a 2-percent pay increase on their next paychecks.

    The Harriman City Council approved the fiscal 2012 budget on Sept. 27, including raises that were to begin the first pay period after final passage.

    In addition to the raises, the city property tax rate of $1.1933 was rounded up to $1.20 per $100 valuation.

    Treasurer Charles Kerley said it would make little difference to property owners.\

    For example, a person with a $100,000 home will pay about $1.68 more a year.

  • Clinch River nuke push

    A huge depression from an infamous breeder reactor project that was scuttled in the 1980s is still visible today.

    Another pit could be on the way at the same Roane County location along the Clinch River.

    TVA is looking into putting small modular reactors at the site on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

    “This whole project is in the exploratory, can-we-make-this-happen, can-we-really- make-this-work kind of deal,” said Jeff Perry, senior project manager for the Clinch River project. “That’s kind of where we’re at.”

  • Bench to honor Goldberg’s life, legacy

    Everybody has a Paul Goldberg story.

    They remember the quiet way he encouraged others, his visits to families in mourning, warm invitations to lunch and the gentle touch he brought to every project, meeting and relationship.

    Friends, family and colleagues shared those stories as they remembered the late Goldberg during a ceremony on Thursday.

  • OCT. 2-8 IS NATIONAL 4-H WEEK: Community service, learning celebrated all year long

    Roane County youths involved in the 4-H revolution of responsibility asks for the public’s help in celebrating National 4-H Week Oct. 2-8.

    For 101 years, the 4-H Youth Development Program of Tennessee has engaged youths in activities that help develop skills for a lifetime.

    These skills range from communications to community service to goal setting to leadership.

    The 4-H program is a nationwide youth development program that has more than 6.5 million youths involved in it annually. 

  • OCT. 2-8 IS NATIONAL 4-H WEEK: Community service, learning celebrated all year long

    Roane County youths involved in the 4-H revolution of responsibility asks for the public’s help in celebrating National 4-H Week Oct. 2-8.

    For 101 years, the 4-H Youth Development Program of Tennessee has engaged youths in activities that help develop skills for a lifetime.

    These skills range from communications to community service to goal setting to leadership.

    The 4-H program is a nationwide youth development program that has more than 6.5 million youths involved in it annually. 

  • Strike!
  • Survey highlights radiation concerns

    Each year, the Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board surveys residents in communities adjacent to the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge Reservation to learn about any concerns regarding environmental cleanup activities under way or about issues that may need to be addressed by DOE’s Environmental Management program.

    The Public Environmental Survey is mailed to about 800 area residents and is distributed at various locations and at presentations the advisory board’s Public Outreach Committee gives to community groups.

  • Dollhouse wins Emilie’s heart

    A Rockwood girl facing a rare genetic disorder now has a new treasure to enjoy when she can’t be outdoors.

    Emilie Gregg, who was diagnosed with plasminogen deficiency in 2010, got a handmade dollhouse decked out with detailed furniture.

    She didn’t know why she was meeting Gail May when the family first came to her home.

    When she was shown the dollhouse, it seemed to take a moment to sink in it was hers.

  • Cox takes role as new school board chair

    The Roane County Board of Education has selected Sam Cox as its new chairman.

    Rob Jago was elected vice chairman at the board meeting late last month.

    “I appreciate the confidence the board showed by electing me the chairman,” Cox said. “I don’t know if I’m going to be able to withstand the pressure like some of the other boys have, but I’ll do the best I can.”

    Cox, who represents the Oliver Springs/Dyllis area, will serve as chairman through September of next year.