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Local News

  • Rockwood finances appear shaky

    Rockwood officials are dealing with financial uncertainty over the latest balance sheet.
    The financial statement received on Jan. 18 showed a general fund balance of only $94,941.55 and an unreserved fund balance was in the negative by $1.6 million.
    It also showed that the city had spent more than $800,000 than revenue taken in.
    Mayor James Watts said the negative reserve fund balance isn’t the actual figure.

  • County delays Rose vote

    Howie Rose won’t be wearing the title of Roane County fire chief just yet.
    An item under special orders confirming his appointment to the position was unanimously postponed for 60 days by the Roane County Commission Monday night.  
    “We want to make sure that we give everybody an opportunity to voice their concern,” Commissioner Ron Berry said.
    The commission voted to establish the county fire department on June 9, 2008.

  • Kingston seeks to revise travel policy

    By MIKE GIBSON
    newsroom@roanecounty.com
    Kingston City Council members are frugal fellows and a conscientious lot, to boot.
    They’ve often paid their own way, sucked up the cost of some extra gas or a business lunch, despite the low monthly reimbursement given them as members of council.

  • Kingston Fossil Plant to test sirens Thursday

    TVA’s Kingston Fossil Plant will conduct a brief test of emergency sirens at the plant on Thursday afternoon at 12:30.
    The sirens may be loud enough to be heard outside the plant boundaries.
    The sirens are used to notify plant personnel in the event of a chemical release at the plant.
    TVA routinely conducts training and drills at Kingston and other fossil plants where chemicals are stored, to ensure proper procedures are followed if a spill or release of the materials were to occur onsite.

  • Vigilence needed in defending freedom

    Most weeks, you’ll find me esconced in my office in Kingston.
    Last week was not not one of those weeks.
    Instead, I spent several days in Nashville involved in training and other events at Tennessee Press Association’s Winter Convention.
    We had a lot of work to do.
    State legislators have put forth a wide array of proposed legislation that could limit openness in government — the very foundation of democracy.

  • Shedding light on dark topic

    Health Occupations Students of America helps give young people an early start in delivering health care to people.
    A group of HOSA students at Roane County High School have embraced life saving at its core by working on the topic of teen suicide.
    They will present their  HOSA Community Awareness Project findings at the regional competition at Roane State Community College Feb. 24.

  • Severe weather week set

    Tennessee Emergency Management Agency and the National Weather Service are promoting preparedness during Tennessee Severe Weather Awareness Week, Feb. 19-25.
     “Tennessee has experienced two years of unprecedented natural disasters and individual preparedness is more important than ever, said TEMA Director James Bassham. “Emergencies and disasters can happen anywhere and any time.”

  • Be mine, Valentine
  • V-Day at the Cloverleaf
  • Input sought in school director search

    The Roane County Board of Education has approved a timeline for hiring a new director of schools.

    The job will be posted from Feb. 14-March 15.

    Wayne Qualls, who the board hired to help with the search, will recommend 10 people for the board to interview.

    “You’re going to have a qualified person and a certified person,” Qualls told the board on Thursday. “Whether or not they’re going to be capable in your mind to do what you want them to do here will be the question you guys will have to answer.”