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Local News

  • Aytes not bothered by Common Core controversy

    Roane County Director of Schools Gary Aytes said he’s not concerned with the controversy surrounding the Common Core State Standards.

    “I don’t have time to be,” he said. “We do what we’re told, and we’re told that we’re going to do Common Core, so that’s what we’re preparing for.”

  • Bruner suspension impacts courts

    Harriman attorney Spence Bruner won’t be available for the February through April term of Roane County Criminal Court because he’s suspended from practicing law.

    The term starts next week.

    Assistant District Attorney General Bill Reedy said the cases where Bruner is the defense attorney will be continued until the June through August term.

    The Tennessee Supreme Court suspended Bruner for 90 days on Jan. 31 for violating rules on expediting litigation, fairness to the opposing party and counsel and misconduct.

  • Road salt supplies dwindling this winter

    The unusual amount of wintery mixes has substantially cut down Harriman’s salt supplies, but officials said Wednesday they were ready for the snow storm forecasted earlier this week.

    “We are pretreating right now, and then we’ll salt if we have to,” Drack Langley said Wednesdaymorning.

    Langley supervises the Harriman Street Department.

    “We are low, but we have enough if it comes.”

    He said they’ll use a mix of salt with chips (grit) and sand.

  • Harriman sets sights on future goals

    Harriman is looking to the future again, planning to review the city’s longterm goals and vision.

    Municipal Technical Advisory Service was supposed to be in Harriman last month, but bitterly cold temperatures and snow forced a rescheduling.

    The “visioning” meeting is now set for 6 p.m. March 18.

    “Expect a two, two-and-a-half hour meeting on March 18,” said Harriman Mayor Chris Mason recently.

    “I think we need a short-range and a long-range plan,” Mason said.

  • Two offices, only one Berry

    Ron Berry has picked up petitions to run for county commissioner and for circuit court clerk.

    When asked about it, Berry said he is exploring his options.

    The qualifying deadline is April 3, so Berry has until then to choose.

    “I’m just going to see what things are looking like,” he said.

    All 15 county commission seats will be on the ballot for the Aug. 7 election. Berry is one of three commissioners representing District 1.

  • Part-time job pays $93,000-plus

    Imagine a part-time job that pays more than $93,000.

    Moreover, if you pay taxes in Roane County, you’re footing the bill.

    Despite being a part-time job, the position of Roane County attorney pays $93,775.

    That’s more than the salaries of the sheriff and road superintendent, who each make $81,208, work full time and supervise government staffs.

    One county commissioner questioned the logic of the situation this week.

  • Roane County Schools closed on Thursday, Feb. 13, because of bad weather
  • Roane Central looks at possible 20 percent rate increase

    Roane Central Utility District's board will be considering a 20 percent rate increase at a meeting at 3 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13.

    Manager Bob Creswell feels it's a necessity due to a what he sees as a dramatic drop in revenue due to lower water sales to one of the utility’s biggest customers, TVA.

  • EPA: Coal ash OK in wallboard, concrete

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has released its evaluation of the two largest beneficial uses of coal ash — the stuff involved in TVA’s Kingston Fossil Plant disaster.

    It may be used in concrete as a substitute for Portland cement, and the use of flue gas desulfurization gypsum as a substitute for mined gypsum in wallboard.

    EPA’s evaluation concluded that encapsulated coal ash in concrete and wallboard is comparable to virgin materials.

  • History excellence to be honored

    East Tennessee Historical Society is seeking nominations from across the region for awards of excellence in the field of history.

    Each year, the society recognizes individuals and organizations that have made significant contributions to the preservation, promotion, programming, and interpretation of the region’s history.

    Awards are in four categories:

    The Award of Distinction recognizes a special project, such as publications, building preservation, or special program, such as a conference, heritage event, publication or lecture series.