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Local News

  • Exit 350 change reconsidered

    The state appears to be reconsidering its stance on proposed design changes to westbound Exit 350 on Interstate 40.
    The original change called for the elimination of a right merge lane toward Harriman.
    A red light has been approved at the intersection, but plans to eliminate a right lane that merges onto Pine Ridge Road heading to Harriman proper didn’t make sense to many people.
    “The people are against doing that, just like we are,” said Harriman Councilman Lonnie Wright.

  • Feathered meth victim finds home
  • Sheriff denies jail-beating allegations

    Roane County Sheriff Jack Stockton said Thursday he has yet to hear back from the FBI about the outcome of an investigation into allegations that inmates were being paid by jailers to beat up other inmates.

    “I don’t think there’s anything to it,” the sheriff said. “I just think we got a habitual liar that’s making his allegations to try to manipulate the system.”
    Stockton said the allegations were made by Charles Daniel Mullins, whose rap sheet includes rape, theft and other charges.

  • Kingston budget committee official

    Kingston City Council members will have extra insight into city budget matters throughout the fiscal year after they passed an ordinance establishing a financial review committee.
    According to Mayor Troy Beets, the committee will have no decision-making power, but will act as a liaison between council and city financial planners. The committee will consist of two council members, the city manager, the city budget officer, plus an administrative employee.

  • Government responds to Rocky Houston motion to dismiss

    The government has responded to Rocky Houston’s motion that requests dismissal of his federal indictment on felon in possession of firearms charges.
    Houston contends that’s an appropriate action because thanks to a pending appeal, he wasn’t prohibited from possessing guns when the indictment was filed on Jan. 15.
    Not so, said Assistant U.S. Attorney David Jennings in the response filed last week.

  • Former UT chief welcomed to RSCC foundation

    Former University of Tennessee President Joe Johnson has been named to the board of directors for the Roane State Community College Foundation.
    “We are honored to welcome Dr. Johnson to our board,” said Paul Phillips, executive director of the Roane State Foundation. “Having a board member with his expertise and distinguished record in higher education will be a great benefit to the college.”

  • Looseleaf Laureate: Good trip to Western Ky., better to be home

    Last weekend, I made my annual autumn trip to Western Kentucky.
    By the time I reached Owensboro, an Ohio River town close to my father’s roots, it was late afternoon.

    My longtime friend Greta was comfortably seated in an Adirondack chair on the covered side porch, busily working on an editing project and sipping tea. A light breeze rustled the branches of a crape myrtle beside the porch, gently sifting the light and shadow that played on the wall beside Greta.

  • New naturalized citizen likes Roane County fit

    When Marc Duvivier came to America for his best friend’s wedding, he didn’t know he’d be meeting his future wife and finding where he belonged.
    Marc Duvivier recently cemented his commitment to wife Mary Belle and his new country when he was sworn in as a United States citizen late last month after years of having a green card.

    “I’m proud he’s an American,” Mary Belle Duvivier said, beaming.
    “And I am too,” Marc Duvivier said.

  • Working meth labs found in Harriman

    A house on Old Roane Street in Harriman was put under quarantine and a woman was arrested last week after police said several “one-pot” meth labs were discovered there.

    Casey Mills, 19, is charged with manufacture, sale or delivery of methamphetamine.

    According to the warrant, police were dispatched to 1637 Old Roane Street after the landlord claimed he found a meth lab behind the storage building.

    Officer Brian D. Turner said he observed an odor commonly associated with meth-making when he stepped inside the house.

  • Korea War prompted Rockwood man’s first time away from home

    In 1950, a train left Rockwood heading north with some of the small city’s finest young men.

    “Oh yes, we rode on the train,” said Bill Kirby.  “The first time I ever been away from home.”

    “Uncle Sam needed me,” he explained. The Korean Conflict had begun.

    A  picture of the group shows a mixture of expressions — jovial smiles of boys that didn’t seem to fear the future, and others who appeared anxious, maybe even holding back tears.