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Local News

  • GUEST OPINION: Free press also comes with responsibilities

    By GENE POLICINSKI
    Inside the First Amendment
    The First Amendment is very clear in its 45 words that it protects a “free press” along with our rights to religious freedom, free speech and the rights to assemble and petition.

  • Agency offers help for distressed mortgages

    By KEN YAGER
    District 12 state senator
    There is hardly anyone in our region who has not been affected by the economic recession in some manner. 
    The last several years have been especially tough for our region as unemployment has been far too high. 
    Unfortunately, one of the most difficult side effects of unemployment is mortgage foreclosure, which is hard on families who are already struggling to keep their heads above water.

  • Largen honored at courthouse gala
  • Region's top teacher: Harriman Middle’s Smith says students ‘have to know you care about them’

    Harriman Middle School turned around its seventh-grade language arts scores last year.

    The growth was noticed by the Tennessee Department of Education, with officials planning to visit to see what the school is doing right.

    It is also what likely got assistant principal Leslie Smith, who teaches seventh-grade language arts, recognized as the Tennessee Association of Middle Schools East Tennessee Teacher of the Year.

    “She’s able to motivate kids and motivate adults,” Principal David Stevens said.

  • Dad pleads to slugging son for refusing soda

    Brent I. Litton, the father accused of punching his 6-year-old son in the face for not drinking soda, pleaded guilty to domestic assault in Roane County General Sessions Court on Oct. 7.

    Litton was originally charged with child abuse in the incident that occurred at 123 Willow Springs Road, Ten Mile, on Dec. 30, 2012.

    According to the warrant, Brenda Yates told police everyone was fixing their plates for dinner when Litton’s son said he wanted water because he was sick and couldn’t drink juice or Cokes.

  • Tennis court fate still up in the air

    The fate of tennis courts next to Kingston Community Center is still to be determined after Kingston officials deferred action on Oct. 1.

    Kingston City Council member Tony Brown said the courts are owned by the county but have been maintained by the city as per a previous agreement.

    The city pays the light bill, provides benches and nets and handles maintenance on the courts, which are in a state of serious disrepair.

  • Kingston official battling cancer

    Members of Kingston City Council were happy to see Councilman Kevin McClure’s burly figure rumble through the doors of the city hall meeting room Oct. 8.

    McClure showed for the evening’s full council session despite a cancer diagnosis and subsequent stomach surgery that waylaid him in September.

    McClure had a baseball-sized tumor removed from his colon on Sept. 27 and will soon begin chemotherapy in Oak Ridge.

  • Coming to a watery stop

    A Ford Explorer was almost fully submerged in Watts Bar Lake Friday afternoon along Winton Chapel Road near Rockwood.

    Authorities said the SUV plummeted into the water when the female driver, whose name was unavailable at press time, swerved to avoid hitting a deer on the roadway.

    The driver was taken to University of Tennessee Medical Center for treatment.

  • Modern tales on tap for Hauntings tour in historic Harriman

    Mysterious happenings, bone-chilling sights and more will be part of this year’s annual Harriman ghost tour, the Hauntings of Historic Harriman.

    “Some of the stories we have this year are more modern,” said Sammie Mowery, co-chairwoman of this year’s event.

    “We have more ’30s, ’40s and above this time,” she added. “A couple of things are things that happened in the last year.”

    The event, hosted by the Cornstalk Heights Historical Community Organization, will be Oct. 25-26.

  • Pinnacle Pointe price tag going up

    How much has Harriman spent so far on litigation tied to Pinnacle Pointe developers?

    Councilman Kenyon Mee wanted to know, and he shared the price tag with Harriman City Council last week.

    “To date, if you want to count the condemnation with the Pinnacle Pointe lawsuit, we’re at $64,674.28,” Mee said. “That counts the money, the big one would be the $29,000, which called the damage deposit on here, which is actually the money we set aside for them to pay” for condemnation.