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Local News

  • Wallace put ‘family’ in family practice

    The mountains and lakes are what drew Dr. Marty Wallace to establish her family medicine practice in Harriman in 1993.
    She is retiring on Dec. 2, so now she might have time to enjoy them.
    “I hate to go. It is just so hard to tell the patients,” Wallace said. “A lot of them are just coming in squalling.”
    Insurance companies’ control of the medical profession, mounting paperwork and rising overhead are all behind her decision to hang up her stethoscope.

  • Bad drugs: Stores put on notice

    Synthetic drugs are becoming a problem in Roane County, officials report. The drugs have names like bath salts, K-2, spice, potpourri and plant food.
    According to the District Attorney General’s Office, the drugs act as a stimulant on the central nervous system and can result in increased blood pressure and increased heart rate, which can cause severe chest pain, heart attacks or even strokes.
    Authorities plan to crack down on businesses that sell the drugs.

  • U.S. EPA wants to tweet you

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Region 4 is now on Twitter.
    EPA Region 4 serves eight states in the Southeast: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee.
    Existing and new Twitter users can follow @USEPASoutheast to get the latest environmental news that is relevant to them. Followers of the Twitter feed will receive updates on public meetings, events, accomplishments, new laws and policies.

  • 11-11-11 not just any day to special boy

    For some, this Friday — 11-11-11 — will be little more than an anomoly on the calendar.
    It gets a whole lot more interesting for Elijah Daniel Reeder of Kingston.
    According to his birth certificate, Elijah will turn 11 years old on 11-11-11. He was born at, get this, 11:11 a.m.
    His grandmother, Carol Ann Kendrick of Kingston, noted that he was born on Veterans Day 11 years ago while his parents, David and Tracy Reeder, were stationed at Minot Air Force Base in North Dakota.
    He was a bit small a birth at 6 pounds, 5 ounces.

  • Two Roane County bands state champions

    Two of Roane County’s marching bands can now call themselves state champions.
    Rockwood High School and Harriman High School both entered the U.S. Scholastic Band Association state championship competition.
    Rockwood placed first in Division IIIA, and Harriman placed second in Division IIA.
    So how did Harriman get a championship with a second-place finish?
    “The other band was a Kentucky band, so they aren’t eligible for the Tennessee championship,” Harriman band director Jim Hix said.

  • Accidents make going tough on I-40

    STAFF REPORTS
    Two accidents involving tractor trailers snarled traffic for hours on Interstate 40 Monday.
    One happened in the eastbound lane and the other happened in the westbound lane.  
    The eastbound accident was reported at 1:40 a.m. It occurred near the 354 mile marker. According to an E-911 report, a female driver hit a deer, and her car was in the middle of the interstate. The report said a tractor trailer hit the car and flipped. The upended rig was still on the side of the interstate hours later.  

  • ‘Mayor of Midtown,’ Brownie Ellis, dies

    Brownie Ellis was one of Roane County’s liveliest residents, living a rich life beyond the auctioneering business that so many knew him for.
    The industrious businessman, lovingly known by some as the “mayor of Midtown” died Saturday, Nov. 5, after a lengthy illness. He was 81.
    His distant cousin, Roane County Commissioner Randy Ellis, said Brownie provided inspiration for his hard work and interest in politics.
    “It has hit me really hard. He was like a third cousin to me, but he was more like a grandfather,” Randy Ellis said.

  • Kingston goes for the green in greenway

    By MIKE GIBSON
    newsroom@roanecounty.com
    Kingston City Council learned it will have to make a down payment on the Ladd Greenway a little sooner than they’d planned.
    On the other hand, they’ll be getting more greenway than they’d bargained for.

  • United we eat
  • Kingston to decide on policy that dictates financial reserves

    by MIKE GIBSON
    newsroom@roanecounty.com
    It’s not that Kingston City Council members don’t like the idea of saving for a rainy day; it’s just that some don’t cotton to the notion of a set policy dictating how much extra change has to be rattling city coffers at any given time, and what actions must be taken should the balance slip by a shekel or two.

    That’s the message that came across at the Nov. 1 work session, when council members discussed a potential new fund balance policy for Kingston.