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Local News

  • Animal shelter needs donations, too

    Every penny is a plus at the Roane County Animal Shelter.

    Director John Griffin said that’s why the shelter welcomes donations from the community and holds fundraisers throughout the year.

    “Our budget covers a lot of needs, but anything else we can get helps,” he said.

    The department’s budget even includes a line item for donations.

    “Any donations we get, we truly appreciate,” Griffin said.

  • Solar safety in school zones

    Roane County Schools is hoping solar-powered speed-zone lights will save money.

    In May, the Board of Education voted to install four of the lights at the new Dyllis Springs Elementary School. More could be installed at other schools if the savings is clear.

    Board Member Wade McCullough asked maintenance director Robert Jones if he had any record on the reliability of the solar-powered speed-zone lights.

    Jones answered no.

  • Calfee would move on Tiger Haven

    Republican state representative candidate Kent Calfee is vowing to move legislation in Nashville for the Roane County Commission if elected.

    “If they ask me to, I will,” he said.

    District 32 state Rep. Julia Hurley, Calfee’s opponent in the Aug. 2 Republican primary, said it’s misleading to make those kind of declarations.

    “Saying you’re going to do something and being able to do it are two different things,” she said.

  • Man killed when cycle struck

    A Murfreesboro man traveling eastbound on I-40 through Roane County last week died Monday, June 25, at University of Tennessee Medical Center.

    Travis D. Frazier’s 2006 Buell motorcycle was struck from the rear by a 1999 Toyota Corolla driven by Avraham M. Solomon, said Trooper Matthew Vespie in his report.

    Frazier was pinned under the Corolla.

    Solomon and his passenger were both not injured.

    No citations or charges were issued. Drug and alcohol tests for Solomon were requested.

  • Son of one time county executive indicted for drugs

    Tyler Farmer, the son of former Roane County Executive Mike Farmer, has been indicted by the Roane County grand jury on drug charges.

    A sheriff’s deputy went to 156 Greystone Way in Kingston to arrest Tyler Farmer on June 20.

    “Upon arrival, I made contact with Mr. Farmer in the driveway of the residence,” the report on his arrest said. “Mr. Farmer was arrested on an outstanding criminal court capias.”

  • Sewer line access issue resolving

    Despite the scary language in a recent resolution, Kingston officials believe a sewer line problem — access to which is blocked by a private garage — can be resolved without incident.

    “We’ve met with the homeowners involved,” said City Manager Jim Pinkerton. “I’m hopeful we’ll be able to negotiate an arrangement. We’re just asking for the authority to do whatever we might need to do.”

  • THP lieutenant goes back for degree

    Many people decide to return to school — often out of necessity:  to overcome a layoff, increase skills or because of a feeling of unfinished business.

    Tennessee Highway Patrol Lt. Jessie Brooks, 55, falls into the last group.

    Brooks has made a career out of law enforcement, but recently he decided he wanted to accomplish a longtime goal of finishing his criminal justice degree.

  • Assessor contest draws crowd to Tea Party forum

    Experience or a need for fresh blood.

    That’s the decision voters will have to come to, according to two candidates vying for the Roane County property assessor seat this August.

    A candidates forum hosted by the Roane County Tea Party drew a crowd to the Kingston Community Center last Thursday to hear from  incumbent Teresa Kirkham and challenger David Morgan.

    Congressional candidate Scottie Mayfield also spoke.

  • Drug arrests linked to deaths

    Twenty Roane Countians were arrested as part of a multi-county round-up after a federal grand jury in Knoxville returned an indictment charging all with oxycodone trafficking and money laundering conspiracies.

    In some cases, those charged may face life in prison or 20 years to life because deaths tied to oxycodone use may be connected to the drug trafficking charges, said a release from U.S. Attorney General’s Office Eastern District of Tennessee.

  • Looseleaf Laureate: Foundation of friends invaluable

    I’ve been through a rough patch lately.
    I wrote openly about my now-dismissed legal situation, and about running over my cat Pony (the splint should be coming off soon). I also had some bumps in my love life, but we are in a better place now.
    This column isn’t about those situations, but about the people who have helped me find my way through.
    I am blessed with one of the strongest networks of friends a person could have.