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Local News

  • Police say man threatened to kill workers at sandwich shop

    Kingston police arrested a 53-year-old man Thursday morning after he allegedly threatened to kill workers at the Subway on North Kentucky Street.

    Joel Glenn Willis, whose home address was listed as 113 Orchard Road, Kingston, was charged with disorderly conduct, reckless endangerment, assault and resisting arrest.

    “He didn’t try to rob them,” Kingston Police Chief Jim Washam said. “He just made some off-the-wall threats toward them, but it was serious enough that we charged him with it.”

  • Harriman wants old papermill site on list of Priorities

    Harriman officials officially showed their support last week for the former American Kraft Papermill site being named on the National Priorities List.

    Councilman Buddy Holley, who had at first been wary of the designation, recently changed his mind and presented his reasonings to support it at a recent council workshop.

    “I think the consensus is we’re better off going NPL site,” said Holley, who at that time promised to create a resolution for the council to consider.

  • Houston judge taking on new hot-button issue

    James “Buddy” Scott is quite familiar with the Circuit Courtroom at the Roane County Courthouse, having presided over two trials involving brothers Rocky and Leon Hous-
    ton.

    Last Thursday’s hearing before Circuit Court Judge Russell Simmons Jr. didn’t involve the Houstons, but Scott found himself amidst another controversial matter.

    Scott, a retired judge, represents a group of residents who are suing Tiger Haven, a big-cat sanctuary in East Roane County.

  • Vice mayor back to city business after training to be park ranger

    Harriman City Council Vice Mayor Chase Tedder hasn’t been a presence at a meeting since last summer, when he went to a special school to become a park ranger.

    Tedder, who last attended the Aug. 9, 2011, session, said he will be back Tuesday, Jan. 10.

    “I’m back in business,” he said. “I went to the National Park Service Seasonal Law Enforcement Academy in North Carolina. I graduated in mid-December. After I graduated, I stayed on and went to Wildland Fire Academy,” Tedder said.

  • Happy trails to Tidwell and 2 streets

    Harriman officials are optimistic that a project they’ve been waiting years on may be close to fruition.

    Harriman City Coordinator Bob Tidwell, who had his last day Jan. 3, has  said it has been discussed that he will continue working on the project that would put new sidewalks — “trails” in grant speak — and lighting along Morgan and Walden avenues and the small section of Clifty Street that connects them.

  • Last summer’s excessive heat leads to disaster declaration

    Roane County is among 14 Tennessee counties designated natural disasters for agriculture as a result of drought and excessive heat in 2011.

    U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack made the designation last week at the request of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

    Other counties designated as primary natural disaster areas include Blount, Cumberland, Fayette, Fentress, Haywood, Loudon, McMinn, Macon, Meigs, Monroe, Morgan, Scott and Wilson.  

  • Wearable artwork putting on airs
  • Success is spelled ‘E-L-E-G-A-N-T’
  • TVA’s board shrinks by three people

    TVA has filed a disclosure statement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to note the terms of three members of the TVA board of directors — Dennis Bottorff, Mike Duncan and Thomas Gilliland — have expired following the adjournment of the first session of the 112th Congress.

  • Woman’s Oak Ridge job was part of much larger mission

    It has taken Jewell Davis decades to understand that her clerical job as a young woman was part of a world-changing event.
    Then Jewell Brummett, Davis was hired on as a typist to help recruit workers at the newly created community of Oak Ridge. The work there led to the creation of the atom bomb, a weapon that brought about the end of World War II when it was dropped on Japan.
    “We knew nothing about the bomb until it fell in 1945, and I had been working there two years,” Davis said.