Local News

  • Rockwood to open bids for new fire truck

    Rockwood Fire Department may be adding a new fire pumper to its aging fleet.

    Rockwood City Council will open bids for a new vehicle at 5:30 p.m. today, Feb. 25, before the regularly scheduled meeting.

    The last fire department vehicle was purchased in 2000.

    “We are getting to the point our reserve fleet — they are all over 30 years old,” said assistant fire chief Matt Crabtree at a meeting last month.

    Crabtree said they spent several thousand dollars in maintenance on just one vehicle in 2012.

  • Rockwood may change rules for administrator

    The minimum qualifications for a city administrator in Rockwood includes a college degree and training in municipal management, public administration, business administration, planning or comparable experience.

    A candidate is also required to move to the city within 90 days.

    Mayor James Watts is proposing changes to both those categories. Rockwood Finance Committee put off the ordinance until next month.


    Oliver Spring’s Carmichael Park is the former location of the Oliver Springs Colored School.
    Those who want to preserve the school’s memory are getting help from a grant of nearly $45,000 the town received to establish the park.
    Edward Jackson and Kelvin Knaff are members of the undeveloped park’s board of directors.

  • Once-trusted official indicted

    Former Rockwood public works director Tom Pierce was indicted Wednesday on charges that include theft, official misconduct and unauthorized use of credit cards. 
    Pierce was seen as a loyal city employee, and the accusations surprised city officials.
    “I had a lot of confidence in Tom’s ability and the job he was doing for the city,” Mayor James Watts said. “When it all came up, certainly, it was a shock. But again, we had to do what is in the best interest of not only our employees but the city of Rockwood.”

  • Negligent homicide charged

    Timothy Ray Treadway, a 40-year-old Rockwood man, was indicted by the Roane County grand jury on Tuesday for criminal negligent homicide.
    He’s accused of killing 31-year-old Shayne Woodall on Jan. 15.
    According to a Roane County Sheriff’s Office incident report, Deputy Keith Kile responded to 387 Waldo Road in reference to a collapsed man.
    He met Treadway when he arrived.

  • Legislators breakfast on Feb. 25

    The League of Women Voters Breakfast with the Legislators will be held on Monday, Feb. 25 from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. in the social room, Oak Ridge Civic Center, at 1401 Oak Ridge Turnpike. A free, light continental breakfast will be served.
     State Sens. Ken Yager and Randy McNally and state Reps. John Ragan and Kent Calfee have been invited to inform attendees about what is happening in the Tennessee Legislature. Audience questions and input is allowed.

  • Kirkham in the clear on Foote appraisal

    Former Roane County property assessor Teresa Kirkham will not face criminal charges for the reduced assessment on the Regions Bank building in downtown Harriman.
    The building is owned by Dr. Clary P. Foote. Current Property Assessor David Morgan claimed Kirkham lowered the appraisal on the building because she was dating Foote. Kirkham denied those allegations and said she lowered the appraisal on the building because it changed use after Foote bought it.
    District Attorney General Russell Johnson asked the state comptroller’s office to investigate.

  • Former Rockwood department head indicted

    Rockwood's former public works director Tom Pierce was charged Wednesday in a multi-count indictment that includes theft, official misconduct and unauthorized use of credit cards.

    An addendum to the Roane County Grand Jury Report said auditor Phillip Job of the State Comptroller's Office conducted an investigative audit of the Rockwood City Parks and Recreation Department at the request of Rockwood Mayor James Watts and the District Attorney General.

  • Kingston green spree expands

    The construction has not even begun yet, but Kingston’s solar footprint is growing.
    The city’s planned solar farm project is going to be five times the size that was originally proposed.
    Now, instead of producing 50 kilowatts of power on a single site, it looks as if the city and its partner, the firm Energy Source Partners, will produce 250 kw of power across a pair of locations.
    They will be taking advantage of two separate Tennessee Valley Authority power buy-back programs.

  • Kingston ready to go to work on medical plaza

    Kingston officials are tantalizingly close to getting renovations on the new city hall building into full swing now, with old tenants on the verge of departure.
    City Manager Jim Pinkerton said recently that the retrofitting of Kingston Medical Plaza — the planned site of the new city hall — should be “going strong in March.”
    The building’s remaining tenants, the Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center and a physician, are scheduled to leave the building by Feb. 22.