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Local News

  • Harriman library may have period lighting, updates

    The century-old Harriman Public Library will be showing its age a little better soon.
    The facility, which is one of the historic libraries built with funds from famed industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie more than 100 years ago, wants to use TVA restitution monies it received in the wake of the Dec. 22, 2008 ash spill to continue work to return the library to more of its period look.

  • Campers ‘get out’ at Kingston park summer festivities
  • Country drive no smooth ride for traveler
  • Roane Medical staff dedicate portable chapel

    Roane Medical Center’s first portable chapel came with the help of a family with a rich history in divinity.
    The Mason family dedicated the chapel in the memory of the Rev. Anthony Harvey Mason, a longtime Methodist pastor, and his son, Anthony P. “Tony” Mason, who taught Sunday school and was a lay-person in his home church and the United Methodist Church Holston Conference.
    “It is just really an honor for our family,” said Scott Mason, one of Tony Mason’s sons.

  • Schools may seek more money in 2012

    Roane Countians could be asked to contribute more to schools in 2012 due to an anticipated $1.3 million reduction in state funding.   

    “There will be some substantial potential cuts in education or a substantial request for a property tax increase next year,” Roane County Executive Ron Woody said.

    Discussion about the amount of local funding Roane County

    Schools already receive came up during this year’s budget process.

  • Schools: Or will cuts do the trick?

    Roane County Schools are facing a $1.3 million cut in state funding next year, according to school officials.

    “It’s in effect this year, but we’re in the hold-harmless, so it actually takes effect 2012-13 budget,” Director of Schools Toni McGriff said.

    School system business manager Eric Harbin said the cut stems from a decrease in students and a reduction in the capital component of the state’s Basic Education Program.

  • Rockwood assistant fire chief dies of cancer

    The Rockwood Fire Department is mourning the death of assistant fire chief Rondal McNeal.

    He died from cancer on Tuesday.  

    Rockwood Fire Chief Mike Wertz said the loss has been difficult for the station.

    “Everybody is just trying to stay strong for his family,” he said.

    Wertz said McNeal had been employed with the city of Rockwood since 1972.

    He started out in the street department before moving to the fire department.

  • Armory sells, but buyer is a surprise

    The current occupant of the Harriman National Guard Armory building will need to begin searching for a new home.

    “They (the Harriman Industrial Development Board) have done their first transaction by selling the armory,” announced Councilman Lonnie Wright at a recent Harriman City Council workshop.

    The board was originally set to sign a contract with J.R. Global, the company that has been leasing the armory building, for $150,000.

  • Sales near school nets drug offender more prison time

    A convicted drug dealer will be serving 100 percent of his eight year sentence because of his proximity of his crimes to a school zone.
    Harriman Police Chief Randy Heidle said Byron Travelle Bazel, 30, was sentenced July 13 for violation of the drug free school zone law by selling crack cocaine within 1,000 feet of a school.
    “It mandates people serve 100 percent of their sentence, and they are not eligible for parole or probation,” Heidle said.
    Heidle said it was encouraging to see that they are getting strong convictions on drug related crimes.

  • CASA needs helpers

    CASA of the Ninth Judicial District (www.casaninth.org) is now taking applications from prospective volunteers to become court-appointed special advocates.
    Every week, in America, in Tennessee, in our communities, judges face the challenge of making decisions that will affect the lives of abused and neglected children.
    Increasingly, judges turn to CASA for additional information on which to base their decisions.