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Local News

  • Some lines clear, others blissfully blurred

    Decades ago, I lived in Cumberland Gap, a historic little town split between the Old Dominion and the Volunteer State.
    I’ve straddled the Tennessee-Virginia line aplenty.
    But last weekend, on State Street in Bristol, the dual-state thing was a bit  more literal.
    I stood — and even strode — with one foot in Tennessee and the other in Virginia.
    For blocks, the street through the well-preserved downtown has bronze markers embedded in the center to make sure you know which side is whose.

  • First responders appreciation

    KAITLIN KEANE/Roane Newspapers
    Roger Parker prepares lunches to go for the Rockwood Fire Department Wednesday during the first responders fish fry appreciation. Renaissance Terrace hosted the luncheon for the local first responders.

  • Rockwood beggars law loses backing

    When a panhandling ordinance first was discussed last month, Rockwood City Council seemed  united in support of stringent restrictions.
    Things have changed.
    Councilman Pete Wright said he found that the proposed ordinance is unnecessary and current laws provide for dealing with people who aggressively ask for money.
    The ordinance would have limited where panhandling takes place and added other restrictions.
    Councilwoman Peggy Evans remained an advocate of the proposal.

  • Cancer victim in Catch-22

    What can someone do when she makes too much to qualify for government health insurance but not enough to cover the extreme costs of cancer treatment?
    That’s what Tammy Jenkins would like to know.
    She said she draws $50 too much in disability to qualify for TennCare — and because her cancer is not breast or cervical — she does not meet other requirements to be part of the TennCare enrollment.
    She suffers from adenoid carcinoma of the right lung and lymph node.
    “I was diagnosed July of last year,” she said.

  • Kingston store has no plans to move

    A new Dollar General Store is under construction on Hwy. 70 near the new hospital. Roane County Executive Ron Woody said that hasn’t sparked discussions about the one in Kingston.
    “They’re not planning on closing the one in Kingston to our knowledge,” Woody said. “There’s probably enough demand for both of them.”
    The Dollar General in Kingston is connected to the Roane County Jail. Woody said the county would eventually like to acquire the Dollar General building, which is owned by Kingston developer Matt Caldwell.  

  • No county primary planned

    Unlike 2012, the Roane County Republican Party doesn’t plan to have a primary election for county candidates in 2014. The party’s executive committee decided against it, according to an Aug. 8 letter addressed to the Roane County Election Commission.
    “The Roane County Republican Party Executive Committee has voted to not conduct a county primary election in 2014,” the letter said.
    Last week Roane County Republican Party Chairman James Ryan explained their reasoning.  

  • Getting charged up for reading
  • This time, Darnell gets to play

    When Darnell Hamilton took the field with Roane County High School’s marching band last Friday, he knew just what to do.

    From his wheelchair, he easily kept time with the band’s drum corps, even showing a bit of flair at the end of the pre-game performance.

    “He loves the band,” said his mother, Shirley.  “That is all he does is love music,”

    She said her special-needs son, who graduated from Roane County High in 2004, suffers from Crohn’s disease, and complications have wrecked his liver.

  • Roane sponsors NAACP event

    The Tennessee State Conference National Association for the Advancement of Colored People’s 67th annual state convention and Civil Rights Advocacy Conference is coming to Oak Ridge, and Roane County’s unit is the host.
    The convention begins Thursday, and continues through Sept. 28.
    The conference will include leadership and motivational training, including the NAACP Game Changer Initiatives for the 21st Century at the convention workshops and forums.

  • Will we restrict stove fuel, too?

    Coleman fuel isn’t just popular among campers; tt’s also a favorite among meth-makers.
    “It’s a base,” Roane County Sheriff’s Office Deputy John Mayes explained.
    Pseudoephedrine, a decongestant in cold and allergy medicines, is the main precursor used in meth production, according to law enforcement officials. However, other legal products are used to make meth.
    Police reports often list Coleman fuel, coffee filters, Drano, plastic bottles, lithium batteries, tubing and aluminum foil.