Local News

  • Fleischmann still looking for cuts to seal ‘fiscal cliff’ deal

    Roane County’s congressman is noncomittal about the chances for a deal to avoid the what some have termed a looming fiscal cliff in the federal government.
    “I won’t say I’m optimistic or pessimistic,” said Chuck Fleischmann, who represents Tennessee’s Third Congressional District that includes Roane County. “I’m going to continue to be very diligent and vigilant, study the process, so I’m prepared to act if that (a deal) happens.”

  • Alleged offenders arrested in Roane

    A man accused of sex crimes in Georgia was arrested in Rockwood last Friday.
    City police went with the U.S. Marshals Service to a bakery to arrest William Bradley Jones, who was wanted for aggravated sodomy and aggravated child molestation.
    Jones, 22, was arrested and taken to the Roane County Jail.
    His home address in police and jail records was listed as 630 N. Front St., Rockwood. 
    The crimes Jones allegedly committed occurred over the summer in Woodstock, Ga.
    The alleged victim was 15.

  • Change in page size this edition

    Although a changes in the Roane County News logo was made as planned with the last edition, the paper size did not change as announced due to a glitch in the pressroom
    The new, narrower format already adopted by the larger dailies in our area is now being used by the Roane County News.
    Newspapers have made the move to save on newsprint.
    A lack of competition in the paper market and other factors have sent newsprint paper costs soaring over the years.

  • Kingston city hall morphing

    The operative word in the latest progress update on Kingston’s new city hall might be “snug.”
    That’s a good a general word to describe the budget, some of the space allocation, and even progress toward meeting projected timelines for getting the new hall up and running.
    Snug, but certainly not uncomfortable.
    And no one is complaining, as the project seems to be going as well as can be expected for an endeavor of this magnitude.

  • REACH spree still holiday hit

    The early-morning hour Saturday didn’t stop young shoppers at Walmart from enthusiastically making rounds at the store.
    Operation REACH once again took selected youth shopping last weekend, with busloads of young people spilling out at the Rockwood store around 6 a.m. to buy gifts for their families. Later they headed to Rockwood High School and Rockwood Middle School to wrap them.

  • Skateboard park closed due to rash of vandalism

    There will be no more kickturns, ollies, and certainly no more boardslides at Kingston’s Ladd Park.
    For the uninitiated, those are all skateboarding tricks.
    The city’s lone skatepark — at Ladd Park, in the shadow of the Clinch River Bridge on North Kentucky Street — was recently closed down, due to a rash of vandalism incidents.

  • Kingston annual report gets kudos

    By Mike Gibson
    The City of Kingston received early Christmas kudos from the firm doing their annual audit report at the December council workshop.
    Susie Jones Clay of Daniels, Uselton and Clay said the city’s audit, finished every year around this time, was “a very good audit report; all projects tracked well; all departments stayed within budgets.”

  • New gas station eyeing Midtown

    Weigels Stores Inc. is looking at locating a new station in Harriman on Hwy. 70 and will be appearing before the Harriman beer board at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 19.
    The meeting is to consider an application for a permit to sell beer for off-premise consumption.
    “We are going through the process of getting approval at the city of Harriman,” said Chris Ooten, director of real estate.

  • Bank of America gives back

    Officials with Bank of America presented Mid-East Community Action Agency with a $10,000 contribution Dec. 3.
    Jim Checolo, the consumer market manager for the Knoxville area, said Bank of America sets aside funds for charitable organizations each year. Decisions about where the money goes are made on the local level, however.
    “So it’s not just one big corporation making these decisions,” Checolo said. “It’s based on the efforts that this charitable organization does in Roane County.”