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Local News

  • One curious hen and one startled chick
  • Moving on

    Rockwood High School graduate Reanna Henderson loaded up her packed belongings and hit the road this week to embark on the next stage of her life — a private two-year all-girls school, Cottey College, in Nevada, Mo.

    Nervous, yet excited, Henderson is just one of many young folks in the area who are leaving the nest for places near and far and commiting another two to four years or more to their education.

    “I don’t know anyone in Missouri,” Henderson said.

    So why Cottey College?

  • Roundin’ up some fish
  • No Child Left Behind changes may be coming

    Relief could be on the way for schools struggling to make adequate yearly progress toward No Child Left Behind mandates.

    The federal program, which has been sharply criticized by education officials and politicians alike, requires 100 percent of students score proficient in reading/language arts and math by 2014.

    Another requirement is a 90 percent graduation rate by 2014.

    Schools and school systems that fail to meet mandated benchmarks are designated as “target” or “high priority.”

  • Lawyer: Police calls from embattled bar light to normal

    The lawyer for Grill & Pub owner Grover Norton said there’s been average to minimal police involvement at the establishment over the past 10 years.
    Knoxville attorney Greg Isaacs bases those claims on information obtained following a public records request.

  • Drowning victim's body recovered from quarry

    A drowning victim was retrieved from a rock quarry in Harriman Sunday evening.

     


    Emilio Smithwick, 35, of Harriman, was swimming with others at the Walnut Hills quarry Sunday afternoon when he and another man jumped off a cliff into the water.

    Smithwick did not emerge and the second man was injured in the jump and taken by ambulance for treatment of his injuries.

    “There was another man diving off some cliffs with him. He apparently has some broken ribs, possibly,” Harriman Police Chief Randy Heidle said.

  • Water loss drains ratepayers

    Water loss in aging utility systems is a growing concern.

    Rockwood is putting water losses at a costly 35 percent of what it produces, but Kingston and Harriman have dealt with them, too.

    Of them all, Kingston seems to have made the quickest turnaround.

    City Manager Jim Pinkerton, who is also over the city’s water department,  said 10 years ago the water loss was as high as 50 to 60 percent of the water treated.

  • Courthouse’s repairs continue
  • Cooling off at the park
  • Part of an American tragedy: Steel from Towers to rest near twin stacks

    Andrew Benson said he doesn’t usually get choked up.

    He’s also not usually in the position he was in Friday.

    A big crowd gathered at TVA’s Kingston Fossil Plant for the arrival of a flatbed truck carrying pieces of steel from the World Trade Center.

    The steel will be part of a 9/11 memorial at the fossil plant.  

    Benson said he knew three people who died during the terrorist attacks in New York City on Sept. 11, 2001. He  mentioned them during the ceremony.