Local News

  • Hanging up her pad and pen: Columnist calling it quits at 91

    Rockwood’s voice for community news — from social occasions to club meetings and guests to community members’ homes — is calling it a day.

    Josephine McKinney, the 91-year-old ’Round Rockwoodcolumnist for the Roane County News, has been writing some sort of local news column for a very long time, first taking over for her mother, Carrie Ramsey.

  • Oliver Springs, county mourns Sonny Harvey

    Sonny Harvey was a man who knew just about every little tidbit of history about the town of Oliver Springs.

    Claude Smith “C.S.” Harvey Jr., always known as Sonny, died in Methodist Medical Center in Oak Ridge Thursday, two days shy of his 83rd birthday.

    The historian had lived a very busy life, including his activities as a historian and chairman of the Oliver Springs Historical Society.

  • 7 jailed for child abuse at meth lab

    Seven people are facing child abuse and drug charges after numerous items consistent with the manufacture of methamphetamine were found Friday at 100 Oaks Apartments at 900 E. Wheeler St., Rockwood.

    “Deputies made contact with Christopher Lee Powers, who was holding a fixed blade knife, in apartment 204,” the Roane County Sheriff’s Office said in a press release.

    “Deputies observed Christopher Ryan Jenkins running toward a bathroom in the apartment carrying a glass container.”

  • Houston brothers jailed

    Brothers Rocky and Leon Houston have been arrested. They are being held at the Knox County Jail on a hold for U.S. Marshals, according to the jail's website.

    The brothers were booked into the jail on Saturday. John Sanchez, a spokesman for the U.S. Marshals Service, said he wasn't at liberty to discuss the reason for their arrest.

    "I will have to wait until I am briefed and that's not going to happen for a while," Sanchez said.

  • Arbitration may end standoff

    Harriman City Council may go into arbitration over the conflict between the city and Pinnacle Pointe shopping complex developers.
    At issue is whether public money was spent on private enterprise or whether the city owes developers instead.
    “I think we need to get it over with. I think it would speed up the progress in Midtown a lot,” said Councilman J.D. Sampson.He said developers Steve Kirkham and Jerry Duncan believe the city is against them.

  • Kindness counts at Kingston Elementary

    A colorful display at Kingston Elementary School celebrates acts of kindness bystudents and staff alike.
    A large cheerful heart has been painted on two maintenance doors in a hallway of the school, and everyone is encouraged to write acts of kindness on sticky notes and place them on the door.
    Acts range from helping a teacher clean up to standing up against a bully for another student. One child even stayed home from a fun event because their sibling couldn’t go.

  • Free smoke alarms available

    Harriman Fire Department recently received $1,500 in smoke alarms with a Federal Emergency Management Agency grant given through the Tennessee Fire Marshal’s Office.
    Harriman Fire Chief Brad Goss said the roughly 50 smoke alarms feature lithium batteries  with a 10-year lifetime.
    The fire department has to install the alarms themselves. Those interested should call station one at 882-3072 to set up an appointment.

  • Sex offender checks held

    Sex offenders in Roane County got some unexpected visitors Wednesday night.
    U.S. Marshals and local law enforcement teamed up for a multi-jurisdictional sex offender compliance check. The effort was dubbed Operation Honey Badger.
    “We will be visiting the homes of every registered sex offender in Roane County,” said Derrick Swenson, a senior inspector for the U.S. Marshals Service.
    Roane County has 106 registered sex offenders, according to the TBI Sexual Offender Registry.

  • Looseleaf Laureate: Good deeds – and getting something back

    The other afternoon, after I finished up getting the paper out, I grabbed my purse and headed over to the Tennessee Technology Center to donate blood.
    To be honest, free movie tickets were being offered, and I hoped to get me one.
    They pricked my finger to check my iron levels, which were good. I went over the usual forms, and then went through a series of questions with a technician.
    All was well until she got to to one that went something like this: “Have you ver had cancer?”

  • Meth labs busy despite new laws

    Methamphetamine production continues in small laboratories in Tennessee and elsewhere around the country in spite of new laws regulating and tracking the sale of pharmacy products used to manufacture the illegal drug.

    That is one of the findings of a report released this week by the Comptroller’s Offices of Research and Education Accountability about attempts to control access to legal products sold at pharmacies which are later used to create methamphetamine.