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Local News

  • Developer's property tax appeals may be dropped for failure to pay

    Developer Matt Caldwell is in danger of having his property appeals dismissed for failing to pay property taxes.
    Caldwell, who has developed high-end properties in Kingston, has appeals pending with the State Board of Equalization for the 2010, 2011 and 2012 tax years.

    Barry Cofer, a deputy assessor with the Roane County Property Assessor’s Office, filed a motion to dismiss because of Caldwell’s unpaid taxes. The issue was discussed during a status conference at the Roane County Courthouse last week.   

  • Annexation: Harriman councilman wants more of Midtown

    The Midtown interchange along Interstate 40 and Hwy. 70 was a big investment for the city of Harriman.

    Harriman’s work on the infrastructure converted the area from a once-desolate exit off a busy interstate into a major area of commerce that includes Kroger and Lowe’s. It’s now home to a state-of the-art hospital, medical offices and a couple of businesses under construction.

    Also benefiting, Harriman Councilman J.D. Sampson points out, are businesses outside the city limits who are drawing on increased traffic.

  • Five sentenced in elk poaching

    Five people, including three from Oliver Springs, were sentenced after reaching a plea agreement in connection with the poaching death of an elk in Morgan County General Sessions Court, according to the Tennessee Wildlife resources Agency.

    Kenneth T. Kelly, Oliver Springs, Austin C. Woodall, Oliver Springs, Steven H. Daugherty, Petros, Samantha Leann McColl, Oliver Springs, and Donovan Cade Godwin, Coalfield, all pleaded guilty to charges placed after an investigation by Morgan County wildlife officer, Travis Buchanan.  

  • State’s nursing homes for veterans get nod

    Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs Commissioner Many-Bears Grinder and the Tennessee State Veterans Homes Board issued a statement celebrating the U.S. News & World Report 2013 that names the Tennessee State Veterans Homes in Knoxville and Murfreesboro among the best in the country.

    The magazine rated more than 15,000 nursing homes using data research on nursing home safety, health inspection and staffing.

    The source of the data originates from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.  

  • Starved boy’s dad wants trial moved

    Matthew Dotson is requesting a change of venue in his murder case.
    His attorney, Joseph Lodato of Knoxville, filed the motion in Roane County Criminal Court on Tuesday.
    Dotson and his wife, Amanda, are charged with first-degree murder in the death of their 2-year-old son Clifford.
    Authorities have said the toddler was starved to death.
    Matthew Dotson is out on bond.
    Amanda Dotson, who is represented by public defender Walter Johnson, is still in custody.

  • Tiger Haven lawsuit is dismissed

    An agreed order of voluntary dismissal in the lawsuit involving Tiger Haven and nearby residents was filed in Loudon County Circuit Court on March 4.
    No further details were mentioned.
    Tiger Haven, which is located at 237 Harvey Road in East Roane County, houses several types of big cats, including tigers, lions, leopards and cougars.
    Some neighbors filed a $10 million lawsuit against the facility in 2011 in Roane County Circuit Court, claiming the facility caused fear, personal discomfort, inconvenience and a diminution in property values.

  • Check your detectors at time change

    This weekend, daylight savings time goes into effect Sunday morning, moving time up one hour.
    While moving clocks forward it’s also a great time to change the batteries in the smoke alarms in the home, said Harriman Fire Chief Brad Goss.
    Goss said the Harriman Fire Department has free batteries they can install for Harriman residents.
    Call Station 1 at 882-3072.
     

  • Cumberland waters to rise

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District poured concrete for the last pile of the barrier wall this week, which completes the last and most critical component of the dam safety project required to mitigate seepage through the karst geology deep in the foundation of Wolf Creek Dam’s embankment.
    The dam is the major impoundment on Lake Cumberland in southeastern Kentucy.
    It is the last of 1,197 piles that are approximately 3 feet in diameter and extend up to 275 feet into bedrock below the foundation of the embankment.

  • Looseleaf Laureate: What’s that flying high up in the sky?

    A few years before I firmly planted myself in East Tennessee, I made a three-day trek, most of it along Interstate 40, to live in Arizona.
    It was a grueling trip, not only because of the mileage and move involved, but because of the mix of emotions tied to any cross-country departure.
    Except for the excitement of seeing antelope for the first time and listening to the most boring audio book that must have ever been recorded, I remember few details about that late-winter journey.

  • 25-percent tax hike has greater potential costs

    By Ron Woody
    Roane County Executive
    Roane County government’s primary goal is to provide a safe environment in which individuals and communities can improve their standard of living. This goal is supported by three pillars of service provided by the county government: education, law enforcement and infrastructure.
    Roane County supports the pillars of service through many objectives, such as evaluating current programs, identifying new programs, assessing sustainability of programs and striving for a viable and stable tax rate.