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Local News

  • Schools: Or will cuts do the trick?

    Roane County Schools are facing a $1.3 million cut in state funding next year, according to school officials.

    “It’s in effect this year, but we’re in the hold-harmless, so it actually takes effect 2012-13 budget,” Director of Schools Toni McGriff said.

    School system business manager Eric Harbin said the cut stems from a decrease in students and a reduction in the capital component of the state’s Basic Education Program.

  • Rockwood assistant fire chief dies of cancer

    The Rockwood Fire Department is mourning the death of assistant fire chief Rondal McNeal.

    He died from cancer on Tuesday.  

    Rockwood Fire Chief Mike Wertz said the loss has been difficult for the station.

    “Everybody is just trying to stay strong for his family,” he said.

    Wertz said McNeal had been employed with the city of Rockwood since 1972.

    He started out in the street department before moving to the fire department.

  • Armory sells, but buyer is a surprise

    The current occupant of the Harriman National Guard Armory building will need to begin searching for a new home.

    “They (the Harriman Industrial Development Board) have done their first transaction by selling the armory,” announced Councilman Lonnie Wright at a recent Harriman City Council workshop.

    The board was originally set to sign a contract with J.R. Global, the company that has been leasing the armory building, for $150,000.

  • Sales near school nets drug offender more prison time

    A convicted drug dealer will be serving 100 percent of his eight year sentence because of his proximity of his crimes to a school zone.
    Harriman Police Chief Randy Heidle said Byron Travelle Bazel, 30, was sentenced July 13 for violation of the drug free school zone law by selling crack cocaine within 1,000 feet of a school.
    “It mandates people serve 100 percent of their sentence, and they are not eligible for parole or probation,” Heidle said.
    Heidle said it was encouraging to see that they are getting strong convictions on drug related crimes.

  • CASA needs helpers

    CASA of the Ninth Judicial District (www.casaninth.org) is now taking applications from prospective volunteers to become court-appointed special advocates.
    Every week, in America, in Tennessee, in our communities, judges face the challenge of making decisions that will affect the lives of abused and neglected children.
    Increasingly, judges turn to CASA for additional information on which to base their decisions.

  • College Kids and Money 101

    Across the country, families are preparing their college-bound students for what will be an exciting time in their lives.
    As you pack for dorm life, make sure scholarship and financial aid paperwork is in order and pick out the perfect laptop—don’t forget to talk with your freshman about money and financial responsibility.

  • Roane State brings back 2001 cast for Cotton Patch Gospel show

    Roane State Community College is bringing back the 2001 cast for a performance of the musical “Cotton Patch Gospel.”
    The show, based on the book The Cotton Patch Version of Matthew and John by Clarence Jordan, features Jesus, who is born in Gainesville, Ga., in an abandoned trailer behind a motel and grows up in Valdosta.
    In the musical, Herod is a jealous mayor of Atlanta and the Sermon on the Mount is given on Stone Mountain.
    And in the bitter end, Jesus is lynched by local thugs.

  • Welcome more change to Midtown
  • Dragging the fields
  • Kingston focuses on unkempt property

    Kingston resident Jack Muecke has made his disdain for overgrown lots, unmaintained homes and other eyesores well known to local authorities.

    The longtime resident, whose family name and roots go back to the early days of Kingston, may see some improvement soon.

    City officials recently launched legal proceedings to raze an empty house at 514 Spring St.  just across from Roane County High School.

    Until a few years ago, the house was locally renowned for its tall, manicured hedges and overall tidiness.