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Local News

  • Harriman hydrant testing now underway

    Harriman Fire Department and Harriman Utility Board is presently flow testing fire hydrant within the city limits.
    This process could cause water to become muddy or cloudy.
    Water customers are advised  to let water run for a short period until it clears if these conditions occur.
    The testing is vital to make sure that Harriman has an operating water source when an emer-
    gency incident occurs
    and is an annual requirement for insurance ratings.
     

  • School supplies from Harriman Care
  • Walking trail grant decision on this week

    Harriman City Council will decide this week whether to proceed with a grant to make a walking trail in the downtown area or turn the grant back over so someone else can receive it.
    The Council will meet briefly in a workshop at 6 p.m.
    The meeting will precede the 6:30 p.m. police board meeting and the regular 7 p.m. Council meeting.
    Bob Tidwell, who has been working on the grants, asked if the city wanted to spend the money.
    He estimates the cost to the city to be $169,174, with $447,776 in federal funds.

  • Another beleaguered tavern up for beer permit

    The Roane County Beer Board will not consider a permit for the Grill & Pub on Tuesday, but another spot that is well known to law enforcement is on the agenda.  
    Joyce Fulsom is seeking a beer permit for Claudia’s Bar on Roane State Hwy.
    Beer board secretary Bobbie Tipton said the previous permit holder, Claudia Norman, passed away last month.
    Fulsom plans to operate as D&J’s.     
    “The establishment is safe,” Fulsom said.
    E-911 dispatch records for the establishment date back to 2001.

  • Roane County jail certified by TCI last week

    The Tennessee Corrections Institute certified the Roane County Jail at its meeting in Nashville last Wednesday.
    The jail has been dealing with overcrowding issues this year, and some county officials had expressed concerns that might lead to decertification.
    “TCI, they’re really good to work with,” Roane County Sheriff’s Office Chief Deputy Tim Phillips said. “Basically, they just want to help us get into compliance.”

  • Rockwood sewer improvements progressing

    Work is coming along on the  oxidation ditch at Rockwood, Water, Sewer and Natural Gas wastewater plant.
    The oxidation ditch is part of the utilities’ requirements under the Tennessee Environment and Conservation director’s order.
    “We are on schedule, and we haven’t lost any days to rain, believe it or not,” said utilities manager Kim Ramsey.
    The 330-day contract with J. Cumby Construction should be completed by June 13, 2014, but officials are optimistic it will be completed sooner.

  • Bellyache, fevers among fire calls

    Rockwood Fire Department personnel have responded to calls for assistance and ended up doing menial chores like checking the mail.
    A growing number of first-responder calls like that have officials worried that emergency resources are being wasted. They are evaluating what calls they should respond to.
    “We’ve had some issues here in the past, but they really got really bad here lately,” Rockwood Assistant Fire Chief Matt Crabtree said. “We are being dispatched to a lot of calls that don’t necessarily require our services.”

  • Merging schools eyed for savings

    As Roane County Schools ponder how to solve its financial crisis, some officials aren’t sold that consolidation is the answer to the problem.
    “If Roane County had to build a high school, how many pennies (on the county’s property-tax rate) would $40 million cost?” Commissioner Jerry Goddard asked during a recent budget committee meeting.
    Roane County Executive Ron Woody, chairman of the budget committee, estimated that a new high school could cost the county $40 million to $50 million.

  • YOUNGSTERS GET HEALTH SAVVY AT LUNCH-N-LEARN
  • Kingston funds head to county coffers

    One of the duties of a county executive is to look after the financial interests of the county.
    Roane County Executive Ron Woody recently discovered that some of the local option sales tax revenue that should be going to the county is, instead, going to the city of Kingston.
    His due diligence could result in nearly $1 million going into county coffers over the next nine years.
    “The knowledge that we have, because of our understanding of the laws, helped Roane County Government,” Woody said.