Local News

  • Smoot lawyer: Investigation shoddy

    Shawn Smoot’s state-paid defense will include the services of a private investigator. His attorney, Bob Vogel, got a court order in August authorizing the hiring of one.

    “He’s been declared indigent and any of those kind of things the state pays for,” said Vogel, a private attorney who was appointed to represent Smoot this year after the public defender’s office stepped aside because of a conflict.

  • McCarroll can carry a firearm?

    The Tennessee Attorney General’s Office doesn’t concede that convicted sex offender Richard Keith McCarroll has the right to carry a gun, even though he has a court order stating he has the right to do so.
    “Just because he put it in an order that was signed by a judge doesn’t mean his rights under state and federal law to possess a firearm have been restored,” Assistant Attorney General Ben Whitehouse said.

  • Raising new church is community effort

    A new building for Emory Heights Missionary Baptist Church is taking shape, thanks mostly to volunteers in the community.

    Walls are going up where Emory Heights Elementary School once stood.
    “We want to grow. It is going to be big,” said Johnny Devine, a deacon at the church. “We are out of parking. If we have anything special, we don’t have enough room.”
    Devine said on many Sundays the church has to put out extra chairs.
    “We need to reach more people,” he said.

  • Girl Scouts need help

    A shortage of adult volunteers has prompted the Girl Scout Council of the Southern Appalachians to  invite adult volunteers to apply for a role within Roane County’s network of active troops.
    The council said girls who want to become part of a troop within Roane County are on waiting lists because of a lack of volunteers.
    Volunteers don’t have to be mothers of scouts.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET: Right-wing Republicans have their cruz to bear

    Here’s how we began last week’s column:
    Gentle reader, as we write this the world is agog with anticipation as to how long the federal government will be partially shut down, and even more importantly whether the limitation of federal debt that may be incurred is increased and, if so, how much and under what conditions.
    We hope that by the time this writing is published both these conundra will have been successfully, and, more importantly, wisely resolved, but as far as we can see, this is unlikely.

  • Accident closes traffic on I-40


    Interstate 40 westbound was closed at mile marker 343 Thursday afternoon due to a one-vehicle accident.

  • Collecting for a cause

    Bill Wimmer with the Harriman Lions Club participates in the Lions Club White Cane Days fundraiser by collecting donations last week outside Food City in Harriman. The money goes on to Lions Club International to help fight blindness worldwide.

  • Kingston Elementary holds literacy fair
  • Harriman takes step to slow meth

    Users of certain cold and allergy products products may soon need prescriptions to purchase them in the city of Harriman.
    The city approved first reading of an ordinance that would restrict the sales of medicines with ephedrine or pseudoephedrine, joining other cities in following suit to remedy what local officials call a failure of state and federal governments to act.
    “They tried to do this in Washington and Nashville and the other state legislatures, and they won’t touch it because of the lobbyists that come forward,” Mayor Chris Mason said.

  • Sex offender McCarroll cannot vote

    The Roane County Election Commission does not have to allow convicted sex offender Richard Keith McCarroll to register to vote.

    McCarroll sought a court order to require the commission to allow him to vote, but Chancellor Frank V. Williams III denied his petition on Tuesday.
    “I agree with what opposing counsel has said regarding the law,” Williams said.
    McCarroll was indicted on 648 counts of aggravated sexual exploitation of a minor in 2002 for child pornography images in his possession.