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Local News

  • Former leader still keen on Plateau Park

    Seven years have passed, and Roane County has yet to receive a return on the $2.5 million it borrowed for Plateau Partnership Park.

    That hasn’t dampened Mike Farmer’s enthusiasm about the project, however.

    “Whenever you have an opportunity to work with others and reduce the risk to the county residents, then it is a positive step,” he said.

    Plateau Partnership Park is a joint industrial park venture between Roane, Cumberland and Morgan counties. All of the land is in Cumberland and Morgan counties.

  • Love’s passion rewarded in many ways

     

  • Twin Tower climb inspires firefighters

    Two Kingston firefighters joined hundreds of others climbing steps in honor of those who went up the stairs of the Twin Towers in the rescue attempt before the buildings collapsed after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.

    “It was a 9/11 memorial stair climb. It was for the 343 firemen that died in the World Trade Centers,” said Bradley Goss.

    The Twin Towers in New York were hit by commercial airliners that had been hijacked by terrorists. The Pentagon was also hit.

  • Ruppe ‘too valuable’ to lose

    Rockwood City Council will once again consider a proposal to promote City Recorder Becky Ruppe to city administrator at its meeting Monday.

    “She is much too valuable,” Mayor James Watts said. “We are lucky to keep her.”

    Watts, who has reached his term limit this year, said he wants to leave the next mayor with someone who understands the budget.

  • Kingston work could lower home insurance

    On a scale of 1 to 10, the city of Kingston gets a 4 on fire safety.
    And that’s not a bad thing. The Insurance Services Organization rates fire departments according to their level of preparedness every few years, with a 1 signifying the highest level, and a 10 meaning no preparedness at all.

    Kingston Fire Chief Willie Gordon reported on the city’s latest rating at April City Council sessions. The ISO rating also determines fire insurance rates in the department’s coverage area.

  • REAL HORSEPOWER

    Curtis Scarbrough loves his horses.

    Recently, he decided that, together, they could step back in time.

    This week, on a sunny spring day, he walked behind them, holding steady a plow as it cut into the rich brown earth of a garden on Ruritan Road.  

    The garden promises to yield the usual country bounty of corn, okra, tomatoes, onions and beans.

    “I just wanted to see if I could do it,” Scarbrough said. “That is all we had when I was coming along. We didn’t have tractors. It was either a horse or a mule.”

  • Smoot bond revoked over DUI charge

    Bond for accused murderer Shawn Smoot has been revoked.

    Prosecutors moved for the revocation following Smoot’s arrest on DUI charges Tuesday in McMinn County.

    The order was signed by Criminal Court Judge Eugene Eblen and was effective immediately.

    Smoot is charged in Roane County with first-degree murder in the death of Brooke Nicole Morris, whose  body was found in Roane County on Oct. 15, 2011.

    Smoot had not turned himself in as of Friday afternoon.

  • Case against Ward involves alleged stolen tires

    The emerging criminal allegation against Harriman business owner Tim Ward involves stolen tires, according to Georgia authorities.

    Ward owns Tim’s Tire Service. He is charged in Catoosa County, Ga., with one count of violating the Georgia Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act.

    A Catoosa County grand jury returned the indictment on April 9.

    Roane County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Junior Templeton arrested Ward at his tire business in Harriman on April 17.

  • Stockton joins ‘Boston Strong’

    With a sheriff for a husband, Roane County runner Tara Stockton is used to being around law enforcement.

    But even she was overwhelmed by the police presence she witnessed Monday while running in the Boston Marathon.

    “It was unbelievable,” she said. “They had every kind of law enforcement you can think of.”

    Three people were killed and hundreds of others injured when bombs exploded near the finish line at last year’s marathon.

  • Students earn their colors on recorders

    Midtown Elementary School’s music room fills with the sound of the simple instrument of recorder.

    Some fifth-graders smile as they deftly move their fingers on the flute-like instrument; others frown when they hit a sour note.

    This is what recorder karate looks like.

    The students use the recorders during class, but they also can practice before or after school to earn a “belt”— a colorful string to tie to their recorder.