Local News

  • Burglary at golf course rattles city

    A break-in at the Emory Golf Course in Harriman last week has officials thinking of getting cameras.
    Councilman Kenyon Mee said someone smashed the register and got a small amount of cash and drinks.
    “The new one is going to be around the $2,000 range,” Mee said of a register.
    Mee added that the  board had discussed a security system before.
    They are also considering going to a register that can do point-of-service transactions for debit and credit cards.

  • Local detective honored for his drug work

    Jason Mynatt’s resume just got more impressive.
    The detective with the Roane County Sheriff’s Office recently was named the Eastern District Narcotics Officer of the Year and the State Narcotics Officer of the Year at the Tennessee Narcotics Officers Association Training Conference.
    “It was an honor,” he said.
    Mynatt is a member of the Roane County Joint Drug Unit, which was named the Drug Unit of the Year at the conference.
    Rockwood Police Department detective Josh Rymer, a member of the unit, called the honor humbling.

  • Soldier for Germany in World War II talks of experiences, good and evil

    Unlike many former prisoners of war, German Army veteran Gerhard Hennes has fond memories of his time in captivity.
    A lieutenant in the Afrika Corps, Hennes spent two years in World War II POW camps — including a year at Crossville — after being captured at Tunisia in 1943 by the British.
    He said he ate well and was treated fairly by his captors, in stark contrast to how his own army dealt with the Russian prisoners he encountered in the autumn of 1941.

  • Kingston considers solar farm

    Kingston City Council members went down to the farm recently and came back enthusiastic and ready to plant.
    Solar panels, that is.
    Mayor Troy Beets and Council Members Don White and Norm Sugarman visited a solar farm in Franklin, as part of council’s ongoing consideration of placing such an operation in Kingston.
    A solar farm is a dense collection of solar panels that produce electricity, which can then be used or resold at a profit.

  • Bojangles looking at Midtown

    Popular chicken fast food chain Bojangles is considering locating in Midtown.
    “Bojangles has submitted a subdivision and site plan for Midtown for Nov. 28,” said Harriman Building Inspector Maria Nelson.
    The Harriman Regional Planning Commission will be in special-called meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 28, at 5 p.m. to consider the plan.
    Nelson said the restaurant is considering locating the fast food chain next to Physicians Plaza on Hwy. 70 in Midtown.

  • The vital issue Congress won’t address

    Center of Congress
    With the elections over, Congress faces a full plate of tough issues when it reconvenes.
    There will be a lot of talk about fiscal matters, “grand bargains,” and sorting out party caucuses.
    But there’s one vitally important question we’re certain to hear nothing about.
    That is Congress’s own behavior — and more specifically, the behavior of its members.

  • Operation REACH funds way down

    Jane Ollis has been working with Operation REACH for more than 25 years. She said she remembers few years like this one.

    With less than three weeks to go before they take children shopping, Ollis said Operation REACH is well below its fundraising goal.

    “Our goal is $135,000, and we’ve got $28,800,” she said. “By this time, we normally have over half our goal.”

  • RSCC reception for new college president

    Dr. Julian Ahler and his wife Margo chat with new Roane State Community College President Chris Whaley earlier this month during a meet-and-greet reception for Whaley.

    The first Roane State alumnus to helm the college, Whaley lives in Harriman and was a Roane State administrator prior to his appointment due to the retirement of Gary Goff.

    Whaley is the fifth president in Roane State’s history.

  • Parking-lot bash helps Kingston with noise ruling

    Kingston City Council members passed a new noise ordinance at their Nov. 13 meeting, but not before throwing a party in the parking lot of Kingston Community Center, then nearly rethinking their entire approach to the problem once the meeting started.

    Well, it wasn’t actually a party, but it might have seemed like such to curious passersby.

  • It’s beginning to look a lot like ...

    It may not yet be Thanksgiving, but Greg Leach of Kingston Public Works spent last week affixing city Christmas decorations to utility poles to dress up city sidewalks holiday style.

    Leach’s counterparts in Harriman and Rockwood completed similar tasks along their thoroughfares to give the cities a feeling of Christmas.

    Though consumers are frequently heard to bemoan the jumpstart of decorations and advertisements before cooking their Thanksgiving bird, the cities seem to have joined in the early celebrations.