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Local News

  • Mother killed in Mountain View accident

    A mother of two was killed in a car accident on Saturday. The accident happened on Mountain View Road near Rockwood.  

    According to the Tennessee Highway Patrol, 34-year-old Dina M. Blevins was killed after a car driven by Thomas A. Stricklan crossed the center line and hit her head on. Stricklan, 27, had a Joiner Hollow Road address.

    Blevins, who lived on Mountain View Road, was driving north with her daughter and boyfriend.

    They both suffered injuries in the crash.

    The THP report said criminal charges are pending.

  • Man hurt in fall from roof

    STAFF REPORTS
    A construction worker was injured when he tumbled from a building at Rockwood Middle School Monday morning.
    “One of the construction workers fell off the roof while they were working on the middle school gym project,” said Rockwood Police Chief Bill Stinnett.
    The worker, who could not be identified before press time, fell onto concrete rebar, but was alert, according to a report from Roane County E-911.
    The call sheet said the worker fell more than six feet.

  • Rockwood gets new utility board, welcomes new utility manager

    Rockwood City Council is no longer sitting as the Rockwood Water Sewer and Gas Board.
    During a Monday special-called meeting, the board approved re-establishing the utility board and appointed  members to that board.
    They include Capstan General Manager Loren Bone, Councilman Dudley Evans, former councilman Darryl Meadows, nuclear engineer Tim Couch and businessman Eddie Lee.
    Those board members got to know the new manager, Kimberly Ramsey, a civil engineer that will begin work on Monday.

  • Harriman growth on hold – for now

    Harriman has very few options if officials want to move forward on expanding the city’s boundaries.
    The city’s request to reconvene the coordinating committee that sets urban growth boundaries has been denied, even though officials have said they followed procedure in 2007 and the committee never was convened.
    City Attorney Harold Balcom discussed the issue at a council meeting earlier this month. He said the city had a few options, including taking the county to court to force it to reconvene the committee or do as suggested and restart the process.

  • A special meal
  • City & County Meetings

    MONDAY, APRIL 18
    • Harriman Industrial Development Board will meet at 6 p.m. in Harriman Municipal Office Complex.
    • Rockwood City Council will meet in special-called session at 7 p.m. in Rockwood City Hall. Purpose of the meeting is consideration and possible action on a resolution to appoint five members to the Rockwood Water, Sewer and Natural Gas Board.

    TUESDAY, APRIL 19

  • Things You Should Know

    Editor’s note: The deadline for including items in Calendar is at least one week before the event. Items appear as a public service as space is available. Unless otherwise noted, all events and activities are open to the public.
    MONDAY, APRIL 18

  • Ramsey to manage utilities in Rockwood

    It didn’t take Kimberly Ramsey long to consider Rockwood’s offer to head up three of its city-operated utilities.

    Ramsey, a former Farragut town engineer and interim town administrator, accepted the Rockwood Water, Sewer and Natural Gas general manager’s job the day after her second interview last week.

    “There is no doubt in my mind she’ll do a great job,” said Rockwood Mayor James Watts. “She’s one of the most qualified individuals that I thought we could find.

  • Mom says boy will 'never forget' teacher-led pig taunts, oinking

    School is now going well for the Bowers Elementary School student who was oinked at in his kindergarten class last month, his mother reported.

    “Everything’s been fine,” April Norris said last week. “I’m hoping that continues.”

    Her son’s teacher – Debbie Hayes – was reprimanded after another teacher reported seeing Norris’ son in the middle of a circle of other students. The students in the circle were oinking and making pig sounds.

  • Harriman eyesores may help feed the city's hungry

    Property that many consider a blight on Harriman’s curb appeal may soon be the source of green, leafy nutrition for family tables in the city’s communities.

    “It is called community-supported agriculture,” said Harriman City Council member Chase Tedder.

    Tedder embraces the plan, which was recently introduced by council member Ken Mynatt as a way to put vacant lots in the city to good use.

    Mynatt said the project could take off when a few of the burned-out homes that have been left standing are removed.