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Local News

  • Griffith belts one for Vols

    Dianne Griffith has entertained with her powerful pipes before.

    It wasn’t until recently that she sang for a crowd at Thompson Bolling Arena in Knoxville, however.

    Griffith, who performs with the Roane County Choral Society and the Knoxville Opera Company, sang The Star-Spangled Banner on Nov. 8, when the University of Tennessee’s Lady Vols soundly defeated Union University in exhibition play.

    More than 11,000 fans were in the stands.

  • County officials pass ambulance rate increase

    Roane County commissioners Bobby Collier and Nick Forrester represent the same district.

    Forrester said constituents flooded him with calls urging him to oppose a rate increase for ambulance service.
    Collier, on the other hand, said he didn’t receive any such calls.

    The contrast may have explained their votes.

    Saying he thought the rate increase made good business sense, Collier voted in favor of the rate increase, which passed by a 10-5 vote at Monday’s commission meeting.  

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET by Gerald Largen: Charles Holiway offers common sense plan

    We were pleased to see Damon Lawrence’s front page article in Monday’s issue of the News entitled “Enforcing ID law to be a matter of trust at the polls.”

    This article arose from that abominable act of the legislature requiring government issued photo identification documents in order to exercise that most fundamental of Americans’ birthrights, the right to vote.

    In case you missed it, Damon’s first paragraph read thusly:

  • Princess preservation gets honored

    The effort to reclaim the majesty of Harriman’s Princess Theater continues to draw praise from those passionate about preservation.

    This time the East Tennessee Preservation Alliance announced that Harriman’s effort was a winner of the 2011 East Tennessee Preservation Award.

    The alliance named the award winners on Nov. 11 at Jonesborough’s International Storytelling Center, a part of the 2011 East Tennessee Preservation Conference held in Tennessee’s oldest town.

  • Reduced bond denied for backseat bandit

    Michael D. Buttram expressed his displeasure with a $25,000 bond on a charge of aggravated robbery, and asked Roane County General Sessions Court Judge Dennis Humphrey to lower it on Monday.

    “What I would like to know is something about your background and why you should get a reduced bond,” Humphrey told Buttram.

    After Buttram finished telling the judge some things about himself, the prosecutor asked court clerk Jennifer Melton to read off Buttram’s criminal history.

    “He’s got a theft of property,” Melton said.

  • Going for the Gold

     

    C.G. Sexton of Harriman waits to have his coins examined by THR & Associates at the Holiday Inn Express last month. The price of gold, silver and other metals have many people cashing in.

  • Harriman joins pain clinic skeptics

    Harriman may join a growing list of communities putting a moratorium on pain clinics until the state enacts a crackdown.

    A moratorium “would stop us from issuing any business permits for pain clinics,” Mayor Chris Mason said at a workshop on Tuesday. “It is just a temporary ban, and I think it’s a big issue.”

    Mason wants to schedule a meeting in order to discuss a moratorium resolution.

  • Kingston eyes new city offices

    By MIKE GIBSON
    newsroom@roanecounty.com
    People often compare so-called “people years” to dog years; but they rarely draw a comparison between the age of people and the age of public buildings.
    If they did, Kingston City Hall would certainly qualify as one of the frail elderly, despite the fact that its 48 years would constitute the hardy prime of middle age in human terms.

  • Bullying alleged in lawsuit

    A mother who claims her son was subjected to repeated bullying and name calling at Walnut Hill Elementary School has filed a $5-million lawsuit against Roane County.
    Former Walnut Hill principal Kevin Ayers, Director of Schools Toni McGriff, all 10 members of the Board of Education and County Executive Ron Woody are named as defendants. 
    “This is a case that needs to be brought to the public’s attention,” Kingston attorney Gary McDonald said.

  • Pain clinic makes its case

    Proponents of a proposed pain management facility called Roane County Interventional Pain Management say the facility would not be like the pain pill mills that are often in the news.
    Instead, while prescription pain relief may be used at times, other methods — including physical therapy and interventional pain management procedures — also would be used.