.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Director says humidity, not mold, at Dyllis Springs

    Roane County Director of Schools Leah Rice Watkins said everything is fine at Dyllis Springs Elementary School, despite concerns that have been expressed about mold in the building.

    “The term mold has been tossed around,” she said Wednesday. “I can’t use that word. I know there was a humidity issue and we had to deal with that pretty rapidly, but everything is going great now.”

    Dyllis Springs, which is located on Ollis Road, is Roane County’s newest school, having opened in 2012.

  • Trial postponed for dad accused of starvation

    The state’s intent to seek life without parole for Matthew Dotson has caused a delay of his Aug. 29 trial date.

    The notice was filed on Aug. 10. Dotson responded to the notice by asking for a continuance.

    The move wasn’t opposed by the state, and the order granting the request was signed by Circuit Court Judge Mike Pemberton on Wednesday.

    Dotson’s trial was reset for Nov. 28. He remains free on a $100,000 bond while the case is pending.

  • Harriman busts counterfeiters

    From staff reports

    Late last month Harriman Police Department located several individuals and found counterfeit money, printers, washing material and other counterfeiting paraphernalia at a local motel.

    The case is still under investigation. No other information was available at press time.

    The department has had multiple complaints regarding counterfeit money in recent weeks.

    On Friday, Aug. 12, two men reportedly passed $1,000 in fake $100 bills.

  • 4 officers up for police chief

    The selection process is winding down for Harriman’s finance officer, judge and police chief position.

    A number of those vying for police chief worked under former chief Randy Heidle, who retired amid accusations of misconduct ranging from theft of city property to how he treated employees.

    “There are four current employees of the department who applied for the position,” said Harriman City Manager Kevin Helms. “They are Jason Joseph, Dan Schneider, Brian Turner and Kent Warren.”

  • Webster Pike redistricting put off

    Students in the Webster Pike area don’t have to worry about redistricting for the time being.

    An item under old business on the Aug. 15 Roane County Board of Education agenda that called for the redistricting of that area was deferred.

    Retiring Board Member Everett Massengill asked for it to be put on this month’s agenda. When it came up during the meeting, he asked for it to be deferred.

    “We hadn’t discussed it in a committee or anything,” he said.

    The motion to defer passed 10-0.

  • Lion Kings, Roane version

     

    Jerry Turbyville, left, president of the Harriman Lions Club, and Rick Ross, president of the Kingston Lions Club, were recently appointed to their new roles.
     

  • Mayor, Council pay may almost double

    Harriman City Councilman Kenyon Mee hopes successors to the city’s elected posts will take home more money for their service.

    That’s why the outgoing Council member pitched an ordinance to raise the salaries of Harriman’s mayor and City Council members.

    “This is comparable, if anybody wants to know, to other cities and the county,” said Mee.

    Harriman City Council approved first reading of the ordinance, which proposes raising the monthly salary of the new mayor from $175 to $300 a month.

  • Rosado denied parole on five-year sentence

    Tammy Ellen Rosado was denied parole last month.

    That means the 47-year-old Roane County woman will spend more time behind bars for her voluntary manslaughter conviction in the death of James Cobb.

    Assistant District Attorney General Bob Edwards prosecuted Rosado for the state. He accompanied some of Cobb’s relatives to Rosado’s parole hearing.

    “We all kind of said our side of it, trying to convince the parole officer to deny her parole, and he agreed,” Edwards said.

    “We were happy with it.”

  • Harriman rounds up its tax rate

    The first reading of the Harriman budget for the fiscal 2017 year includes rounding up the property-tax rate from $1.2197 per $100 valuation to $1.22 per $100 valuation.

    Harriman Treasurer Charles Kerley said a taxpayer with a $100,000 appraised-value home will pay 7 cents more on the tax rate, while a home with a $200,000 appraised-value will pay 15 cents more.

    Councilman Wayne Best said the city is keeping its tax rate low, but that means the city is limited in what it can do.

  • REPRESENTING ROANE AT THE RNC