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Local News

  • Kingston rezoning passes

    If there were any lingering doubts as to why a full house turned out for the Aug. 12 Kingston City Council meeting, they were dispelled when most of the attendees left, en masse, midway through the agenda.

    That was after council members passed the second reading of an ordinance rezoning a 47-acre parcel off North Kentucky Street, clearing a path for a proposed new Kingston Pointe development featuring a car dealership, big-box store and other retail outlets.

  • Sampson winding down term

    Harriman Councilman J.D. Sampson cares about his city.

    His fellow council members recognized that when they expressed their pleasure in serving with him over the years.

    Sampson, after 10 years on the council, lost re-election last week.

    “We do appreciate his service,” said Councilman Lonnie Wright. “There is no doubt where J.D.’s heart lies.”

    “... and I really do appreciate his colorful commentary over the years ― most of it,” Wright quipped.

  • Harriman starts city manager search process

    Harriman officials kicked off the start of their search for a city manager this week and may have someone on board by October.

    Harriman City Council met in workshop session with Municipal Technical Advisory Service consultant Warren Nevad, who discussed the intent to follow a search process like MTAS did with Kingston.

    Kingston’s search, after the retirement of manager Jim Pinkerton, resulted in the hiring of David Bolling last year.

  • Lawyer claims gunfire at cat sanctuary

    Tiger Haven neighbor Toby Rhynehart and his attorney allege shots were being fired inside the big-cat sanctuary last week.

    They called police, although they don’t believe shots were being fired at them.

    Rhynehart faces a reckless endangerment charge for allegedly shooting at Tiger Haven on May 14, 2013. He denies the charge, insisting he was shooting at a private range built on his 114-acre farm that abuts Tiger Haven.

  • Vanderbilt study sheds light on the origins of breast cancer

    A protein essential for growth of normal breast tissue also may play a role in breast cancer, Vanderbilt University researchers have found.

    Reporting recently in Nature Cell Biology, Yongliang Huo and Ian Macara for the first time describe the function of a protein called Par3L, which is expressed by a gene Macara and colleagues discovered at the University of Virginia in 2002.

    Par3L is very similar to another protein, Par3, which functions as a polarity protein.

  • Star in the works
  • Hearing on tax-hike request

    The Roane County Commission’s Budget Committee will hold a public hearing on the proposed 2014-15 budget on Thursday.

    The Roane County Board of Education is asking for a 9-cent increase in the property tax rate to fund the school budget.

    “So far everything has been respectful on both sides,” Commissioner Bobby Collier said. “I’m hoping that’s going to continue.”

  • Free eats for some schools in Roane County

    Students at Ridge View Elementary in Rockwood, Bowers Elementary and Harriman Middle School in Harriman and Midway Elementary are all eating for free.

    The funds are from the Community Eligibility provision of National School Lunch and School Breakfast programs.

    Director of Schools Gary Aytes said those schools all have the highest indicators of need in the system.

  • Manson Clan’s Davis refused parole again

    A California parole board’s decision to release Charles Manson follower and Roane County native Bruce Davis has been overturned again.

    Manson and his followers went on a killing spree in 1969. Davis was convicted of the murders of Gary Hinman and Donald “Shorty” Shea. He was sent to California state prison in 1972 with a life sentence.

    He was granted parole in March, but the parole board’s decision was overturned by California Gov. Jerry Brown last week.

  • Porter Park’s renovation moves to faster track

    Kingston’s newest old park will soon get a serious upgrade, and Kingston officials are now hashing out the details.

    The county deeded Gertrude Porter Park — which used to be school property — to the city in February. And while city officials were pleased with the prospect of acquiring the facility, they knew it needed more than a little rehabilitation. Toward that end, they applied for a $250,000 Local Parks and Recreation Fund grant from the state.