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Local News

  • THE BOYS OF SUMMER AT CAMP

    Carter Puckett, left, Riley Walker, center, and Keyton Hope await their turn to shine during Kingston Parks and Recreation’s third annual youth baseball camp earlier this month.

    “Our biggest thing is to get them excited about playing baseball at the start of the season,” said Rick Ross, Kingston parks and recreation director.

    The camp, open to ages 7-12 at Southwest Point, gave youths opportunities to work on their infield and outfield games, as well as pop flies, hitting and gaming fundamentals.

  • Roane jobless figures down

    Both Roane County and Tennessee are off to a good start in 2014 — at least on the job front.

    Unemployment rates for both the county and the state fell 0.1 percent to 7.2 percent in January, according to statistics released late last week by the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

    Roane County’s is down 1.4 percent from the 8.6 percent rate in January 2013. The state is down 1.8 percent from a year ago, when its unemployment rate was 9.0 percent.

  • Roane teachers among best-paid

    During his tenure as president of the Tennessee County Services Association, Roane County Commissioner Bobby Collier said he got the feeling that officials from other counties were unsympathetic about the financial problems facing Roane County Schools.

    “When I asked why, they said it’s because you pay your people very well,” Collier said.

    According to the Tennessee Department of Education’s 2012-13 Annual Statistical Report, Roane County classroom teachers have an average salary of $49,240.

  • Former official dead

    Friends are remembering Rockwood resident and former Roane County commissioner Don “Duck” Wicks as a man who had a big impact on his community.

    Wicks, who is the father of General Sessions Judge Jeff Wicks, died on Wednesday. He was 77.

    He served on the Roane County Commission from 1986-94 and again from 2002-06.

    “Commissioner Wicks was one of the best commissioners I ever served with,” Roane County Attorney Tom McFarland said. “He knew the budget inside and out.”

  • Renaissance fair gets its ale

    Renaissance Festival organizers will be able to sell alcohol.

    Harriman City Council approved a special-event permit in the city’s beer ordinance in final reading Tuesday, March 11.

    The amended ordinance permits special event permit sales of beverages with an alcoholic content at or below 5 percent of weight.

    The ordinance was mainly approved to allow sales at what is referred to as the Harriman Industrial Park property on Fiske Road, which includes Emory River frontage.

  • Man struck by train in Harriman

    A Harriman man was hospitalized Sunday night after he was struck by a Norfolk Southern train near the Sonic Drive-in.

    Officials said Edward Wells, 79, appeared to have stepped out in front of the train.

    Wells suffered from a contusion on his head that was bleeding heavily and also had cuts and scrapes on his hands and left leg, according to police reports. He was taken by Lifestar to University of Tennessee Medical Center.

  • Accident on bridge
  • Yager sponsors bridge repair grant legislation

    Legislation that would return millions of dollars to taxpayers in the form of bridge infrastructure improvements was approved last week by the Tennessee Senate Transportation Committee.

    The County Bridge Relief Act of 2014, sponsored by state Sen. Ken Yager, R-Kingston, changes the way Tennessee manages its State Aid Bridge Grant Program to make it easier for communities to access state funds to upgrade, repair and rehabilitate bridges that have fallen into disrepair over the years.

  • TVA completes retaining wall at Kingston

    The Tennessee Valley Authority has achieved a significant milestone in its cleanup of the ash spill at the Kingston Fossil Plant – the completion of an earthquake-resistant, underground retaining wall around the containment cell at the recovery site.

    The wall, which completely surrounds the 240-acre containment cell where recovered ash will be permanently stored, was completed on Feb. 20, almost a month ahead of schedule.

  • Prosecutor may run for public defender

    Kingston attorney Terry L. Stevens II picked up a petition on Monday to run for public defender for the 9th Judicial District.

    That creates a potential conflict of interest, because Stevens currently works as a prosecutor for the 9th Judicial District Attorney General’s Office.

    “At my direction, Assistant District Attorney Terry Stevens has contacted the U.S. General Counsel for the federal Hatch Act to request a formal opinion on the issue since his DUI prosecutor position is federally funded,” District Attorney General Russell Johnson said.