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Local News

  • Retiring teachers say their goodbyes

    Love of children is what got Diana Nivens into teaching.

    Her love of youngsters hasn’t gone away, but the longtime Dyllis Elementary School educator is calling it a career this year.

    “I’m going to miss the children,” she said. “It was a hard decision. It really was, but my dad’s 87 and he lives up north.”

    Nivens was one of 13 Roane County Schools retirees recognized during a reception last week.

  • Harriman Farmers Market set to open

    The Harriman Farmers Market is still accepting vendors for the weekly event that starts Saturday, June 11.

    The weekly event is Saturdays and Wednesdays at Riverfront Park through autumn.

    Organizer Pat Mynatt said initial offerings may seem limited this early in the season.

    “We are a producers market, so you are only going to find what is in season in our area,” she said. “We don’t allow resellers, so everything is fresh from the farm.”

  • Tornado relief effort ready to launch

    Rockwood’s First Baptist Church will lead a community-wide missions trip to Anniston, Ala., Friday to help the community rebuild after late-April’s tornadoes.
    Recently, senior pastor Josh Lancaster traveled with church deacon Rick Ellis and student pastor Wes Ford to the Calhoun County area to see the devastation firsthand.
    They were able to identify home repair projects, such as roof construction, drywall repair and rebuilding porches and handicap ramps.
    Already, it’s been an emotional experience.

  • Harriman to seek more TVA funding from foundation

    Harriman hasn’t gotten what it deserves in the wake of the December 2008 ash spill at TVA’s  Kingston Fossil Plant.
    That is the view of Harriman City Councilman
    J.D. Sampson, who is seeking to pursue what he said is $900,000 remaining that the Roane County Economic Development Foundation, formed to help communities affected by the environmental disaster.
    “We’re not asking for something we don’t deserve,” Sampson said at a recent council meeting.

  • Harmon recognized by county

    James Harmon saw countless people honored with commission resolutions during his 22 years as a member of Roane County’s legislative body.
    He witnessed it again this month — only this time he was the one being honored.
    “It was a nice gesture on their part,” Harmon said of the commission’s decision to honor him for his 22 years of service as a commissioner.
    The resolution was passed in April. Officials invited Harmon to the May meeting to present it to him in person.
    He received a standing ovation after it was read.

  • Overdose appears to be cause of pair’s death

    Two people found dead in a home in Rockwood on Thursday apparently died of an overdose.
    A family member discovered the bodies of Kathleen M. Webb and Michael E. Wampler at 787 Bates Street.
    “(Roane County Medical Examiner) Dr. (Bill) Bennett did come to the scene and advised he thought this was going to be ruled as the eighth and ninth overdose in Roane County this year,” the police report on the incident said.
    Wampler was 52, and Webb was 57.

  • Competitive young bowlers on a roll

    A group of youths spend many of their Saturdays honing their bowling skills at the Tri-Cities Lanes bowling alley.
    Competitive bowling might not seem like a youth sport, but at the Midtown alley it’s a popular hit.
    A look at some of the Tennessee State United States Bowling Congress Youth Association tournament scores over the years shows many bowlers from Roane County.
    Two of those talented players that frequent the alley are teammates Mikayla Letner and Joey Goss, both 16.

  • Harriman City Council candidates sound off

    A small crowd braved the chilly wind to hear candidates for Harriman City Council at Killefer Park recently.
    Three incumbents — council members Kenyon Mee, Lonnie Wright and Ken Mynatt — and three-time contender Luther Manning, shared common ground on many issues but one.
    They disagree on the city-manager form of government.

    Mynatt was the biggest advocate and credits that style of managing the city with getting rid of the “good-old-boy” network.

  • Ties that bind

    Rainbows of color adorn many a student at Oliver Springs High School.
    The source is the school’s resource officer, Roane County Sheriff Office’s Steve Sanders, who for several years has braided the nylon strings into patterned bands for students and faculty.
    He started giving them to students who saw him making the bracelets, and Sanders said it is a great icebreaker with timid students at the school.
    He likes to help students struggling with acclimating to a new school.

  • Kids’ Cafe means food, fun

    The Second Harvest Food Bank’s Kids’ Cafe is a bright spot at Rockwood Housing Authority.
    Since it opened a few months ago, many children from the Evans Heights neighborhood have been going there to enjoy food and have fun every Wednesday from 5-7 p.m.
    Recently, they indulged in hamburgers and salads, while drawing “what home means to me,” and submitting them as entries to the Housing Authority’s national calendar.