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Local News

  • Ties that bind

    Rainbows of color adorn many a student at Oliver Springs High School.
    The source is the school’s resource officer, Roane County Sheriff Office’s Steve Sanders, who for several years has braided the nylon strings into patterned bands for students and faculty.
    He started giving them to students who saw him making the bracelets, and Sanders said it is a great icebreaker with timid students at the school.
    He likes to help students struggling with acclimating to a new school.

  • Kids’ Cafe means food, fun

    The Second Harvest Food Bank’s Kids’ Cafe is a bright spot at Rockwood Housing Authority.
    Since it opened a few months ago, many children from the Evans Heights neighborhood have been going there to enjoy food and have fun every Wednesday from 5-7 p.m.
    Recently, they indulged in hamburgers and salads, while drawing “what home means to me,” and submitting them as entries to the Housing Authority’s national calendar.

  • LOOSELEAF LAUREATE: After three days, coming down from Ozone

    By the time this prints, I will be winding up a three-week housesitting stint in Ozone.

    It’s been an interesting gig — 38 wooded acres, a gourmet kitchen, hot tub, master suite with heated tile floors.

    And, outside, multi-level decks overlooking native plant gardens.

    I would have loved to have spent more time on the wooded trails and in the hot tub, but my house-sitting also coincided with three very busy weeks in my life.

  • Harriman Mayors Race: Mason, Best face off

    Harriman’s mayoral candidates share the vision of what Harriman can be but disagree on how to get there.

    Incumbent Chris Mason is going up against Wayne Best, a former fire chief for the city.

    Early voting began on May 18.

    At a recent candidate forum in Harriman’s historic Cornstalk Heights neighborhood, the men talked about their qualifications.

  • Walnut Hill says goodbye

    Schools across the county are closing their doors for the summer.

    For Walnut Hill Elementary School in Harriman, this will be their last time.

    When the new school year rolls around, the students and faculty will join Bowers Elementary School. This change spurs mixed feelings for the Walnut Hill community.

    “I think it’s going to be a great thing,” said principal Kevin Ayers. “From some of the ones (students) I’ve talked to, they’re pretty excited about it.”

  • Inspection changes in store for Tiger Haven

    Officers with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency may not be the only ones entering Tiger Haven in the future.

    A bill that allows a representative from Roane County to accompany the agency on inspections passed the Tennessee House of Representatives 89-2 on Wednesday.

    The Senate passed the bill 32-0 in March.

    Tiger Haven is a sanctuary for big cats in East Roane County. Other species held there include lions and cougars.

    Some nearby residents and county officials have been at odds with the facility for years.

  • Jail gets thumbs up after inspection

    The Roane County Jail was given a clean bill of health during a May 5 inspection by the Tennessee Corrections Institute.

    “The jail is being well maintained and the lieutenant and her staff should be commended for a job well done,” jail inspector Barry G. Suttles wrote in his report.

    “We’ve worked really hard,” jail Lt. Maretta McNichol said. “It takes everybody.”

    The jail has a certified capacity of 172 inmates. The population the day of the inspection was 155.

  • Stabbing, headlock and hiding in the attic

    STAFF REPORTS
    Attics are commonly used for storing seasonal decorations and unwanted personal things. Christopher Yarnell used it as a hiding place to avoid arrest, according to a sheriff’s office incident report.
    Officers went to 1342 Mountain View Road on May 16 to arrest Yarnell on outstanding warrants.
    The report said Harley Sedman told officers that Yarnell was not at the residence.

  • Early voting
  • Four vie for three seats in Kingston

    Three open seats, four capable candidates.

    That is the enviable situation Kingston voters will face in the June 7 city council election.

    Recently all four, including incumbent Norm Sugarman, appeared for a city-sponsored candidate forum. Also running is Tony Brown, John Byrkit and Brenda Timm.

    Among the most recognizable names are Brown and Sugarman. Brown, a former county elections director who currently oversees Roane County Park, has served on the city council twice before.