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Local News

  • Tax increase still galls many

    Carolyn Koon wasn’t worried about the property tax rate when she received her reappraisal card last May.  

    “I’m worried about the bottom line,” she said.

    The bottom line for Koon and many other property owners in Roane County is higher tax payments, despite a lower property tax rate.

    “I’m trying to keep a good sense of humor about it, but it’s getting more and more difficult,” Scott Boyes said.

    His taxes went up $362 following the reappraisal.

  • More than 400 appealing assessment to state

    The fight isn’t over for people still unhappy about Roane County’s property reappraisal.

    The Tennessee Board of Equalization will hear their appeals later this year.

    “We have 424 appeals from Roane County,” Tennessee Comptroller spokesman Blake Fontenay said.

    Last year’s state-mandated reappraisal conducted by the Roane County Property Assessor’s Office left people fuming.

  • More than 400 appealing assessment to state

    The fight isn’t over for people still unhappy about Roane County’s property reappraisal.

    The Tennessee Board of Equalization will hear their appeals later this year.

    “We have 424 appeals from Roane County,” Tennessee Comptroller spokesman Blake Fontenay said.

    Last year’s state-mandated reappraisal conducted by the Roane County Property Assessor’s Office left people fuming.

  • A gentle stretch
  • Lex Lin Ranch
  • Yette's words inspired a nation

    Samuel F. Yette, one of the most influential figures to ever emerge from Roane County, has died.

    Yette, 81, was the first black Washington, D.C., reporter for Newsweek magazine. He also worked for LIFE magazine, partnering with famed photographer Gordon Parks for a five-part series on segregation in 1956.

    He also wrote about the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the 1963 March on Washington.

    Yette not only chronicled the divisions of racism, he experienced them firsthand.

  • Presidential promotion: Obama names Rockwood native DeParle one of his deputy chiefs of staff

    Rockwood native Nancy-Ann Min DeParle’s political star continues to rise.

    Handpicked by President Barack Obama in 2009 to help him with national health-care reform, DeParle was named last week as one of the president’s deputy chiefs of staff.

    The increase in responsibilities and bigger place in the limelight comes as no surprise to her uncle, veteran Rockwood attorney J. Polk Cooley.

    “She’s just a tremendously smart young lady,” he said Friday morning. “I’m very proud of her.”

  • Sales taxes up in December

    Could Rockwood’s best December in years for local option sales tax be another sign the economy is making a turnaround?

    Or could the growing number of low-priced retail stores be a contribution, with shoppers tightening their belts, shopping local and spending less for more items?

    Regardless, Rockwood city recorder Jim Hines announced revenue information to the Rockwood City Council Monday that included some good news.

  • It's that time — tax time, that is

     

    Tammy Cagle assists Charles and Teresa Cates in filing their taxes at Jax EZ Tax in Rockwood Thursday afternoon. Roane County residents fill the front lobby most days eagerly waiting to hear about their tax deductions.

  • Roane man charged with murder in Illinois cold case

    A Roane County man faces a murder charge in an Illinois cold case.    

    Robert “Bobby” Bostic of 354 Tennessee Chapel Circle was arrested by authorities on Jan. 25.   

    Bostic, 70, is accused of killing Carlton Richmond on June 25, 1982.

    According to the Round Lake Beach Police Department in Illinois, Bostic and Richmond were members of the same motorcycle club.