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Local News

  • No parking rankles Wheeler dwellers

    A sign on Rockwood’s West Wheeler Street forbidding street parking has its residents up in arms.

    Rockwood Public Works Director Tom Pierce put up the sign after receiving complaints.

    Rockwood City Council decided Monday to take down the sign, but city leaders will continue to look into what needs to be done to address traffic flow on the street.

    “If we’re going to do something that needs to be enforced, we need to put together an ordinance so it can be enforced,” Mayor James Watts said.

  • Rockwood gives teens a voice in the community

    Rockwood youth have a voice, and the city is listening.

    High school- and college-age youth are part of the Rockwood Youth Advisory Committee. Rockwood City Council member Krystal Hennager is the sponsor for the highly motivated young people who want more for their community and those their age.

    Their first project, a community homecoming bonfire, went well, and now the group is gearing up to help with this weekend’s Halloween party in downtown Rockwood.

  • Swan Pond folks vent to EPA

    Swan Pond resident Don Simon hasn’t experienced much success in his quest to speak with top officials from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. His frustration with that was expressed on Wednesday during a public hearing on EPA’s plan to regulate coal ash.

    “I’m not here to thank the EPA,” Simon said. “I’m basically here to chastise them.”

  • EPA coal-ash hearing draws advocates, environmentalists

    An industry exists for the fly ash produced at coal-fired power plants.

    People who make a living in that industry were very vocal at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s public hearing on Wednesday.

    Randy Compton said he sells recycled ash, which can be used in products like concrete, cement and wallboard.   

    “I take it from the power plant and sell it to the ready mix producers,” he said.

  • 6-car pileup fatal

    An elderly Crossville woman died during a crash involving multiple vehicles on a rain-slickened Interstate 40 Monday morning.

    The Tennessee Highway Patrol identified the victim in the six-vehicle pileup as 76-year-old Irene Atkins.

    According to THP reports, Arthur J. Rivers III, 36, of Oakdale, was traveling east near the 347 exit shortly after 6 a.m. when his vehicle hydroplaned and ran off the road.

  • Pinnacle Pointe fray hurts others

    The fracas between Harriman officials and developers of a Hwy. 70 shopping center is causing problems for more than the parties involved.

    An adjacent landowner has told city officials that three multi-million-dollar development deals have fallen through in the past few years because the potential businesses are unable to use roads in the Pinnacle Pointe shopping center.

    “We lost the medical center. It went to the county. If the road was there, we would have it in the city,” said Harriman council member J.D. Sampson.

  • Kingston man gets tasered in incident

    A Kingston man was arrested after a Saturday incident in which he threatened to harm himself and later hurled threats at his mother.

    A Kingston police report said officers tasered 39-year-old Russell Slonaker for refusing to comply with orders after an officer convinced him via telephone to leave the home without weapons.

    Slonaker was charged with domestic assault and disorderly conduct.

  • Red Cross in need of volunteers

    The Knoxville Area Chapter of the American Red Cross needs volunteers in Roane County to respond to the needs of people who have been the victims of a house fire.

    “It is essential, because if we don’t have them then our services are delayed and people go without,” said Mary Beth Birge, director of disaster services for the Knoxville chapter. “These volunteers are everything to the victim.”

    Birge said the Red Cross responded to almost two dozen fires in Roane County during the organization’s last fiscal year.

  • Falltime fun
  • Design may be flooding cause

    A shoddy design may have caused the flooding that occurred at Roane County’s new emergency management center earlier this year.

    In a letter to County Executive Ron Woody, Purchasing Agent Lynn Farnham said she contracted with McGill Associates, a Knoxville-based engineering firm, to determine the cause of the flooding.