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Local News

  • Disaster recovery committee on the wane

    By DAMON LAWRENCE

    dlawrence@roanecounty.com

    The county long term recovery committee went from meeting every week to every other week. Now it won’t meet again until Oct. 7.

    Only six members showed up at last week’s meeting — not enough for a quorum.

    Roane County Executive Mike Farmer formed the group after last December’s fly ash catastrophe at TVA’s Kingston Fossil Plant.

  • New hope for old paper mill?

    By CINDY SIMPSON

    csimpson@roanecounty.com

    The idea of utilizing the property of the former American Kraft Mills paper mill property in Harriman is gaining new life.

    Harriman Councilman Buddy Holley has been seeking grant money for the property, and he told the council recently he has found a couple of grants that might be available.

    “They are for brownfield sites,” Holley said.

  • Gun-in-parks law may hurt school sports

    By DAMON LAWRENCE

    dlawrence@roanecounty.com

    The new state law that allows handgun permit holders to go armed in public parks went into effect Tuesday.

    That’s a cause for concern for some school officials, since student athletes play games in city parks.

  • Baby dead in pregnant woman's shooting

    From staff reports

    A pregnant woman who was shot in the stomach by her husband Friday morning is in critical condition at University of Tennessee Medical Center.

    Her unborn female child is deceased.

    Authorities said Justin Stone shot Jennifer Stone sometime around 8:30 a.m. Investigators are still trying to determine whether the shooting was an accident or intentional.

    Chief Deputy Tim Phillips said the husband appeared to be upset when officers got to the scene.  

  • New citizens group emerges from the ashes

    By DAMON LAWRENCE

    dlawrence@roanecounty.com

    TVA has endured some harsh criticism since the fly ash catastrophe at the Kingston Fossil Plant.

    Some of the agency’s most vocal Roane County critics have been selected to serve on the Roane County Community Advisory Group.

  • Airport manager gets sky-high honor

    By CINDY SIMPSON

    csimpson@roanecounty.com

    Rockwood Municipal Airport manager Danny Collins has been named airport manager of the year by the Tennessee Department of Transportation Aeronautics Division.

    Each year a manager is selected by the commission. Collins was recognized last month during the 24th Annual Airports Conference in Nashville.

    Collins has been the airport manager since 2003. He has been flying out of the Rockwood airport for 15 years.

  • Labyrinth proposed on Kingston waterfront

    By TERRI LIKENS

    tlikens @roanecounty.com

    The Kingston lakefront could grow a little more reflective.

    Bethel Presbyterian Church has proposed installing a labyrinth on city property beside the church at 203 S. Kentucky St.

    The labyrinth — a long, spiraling walkway traditionally used for meditation, prayer or simply reflection — was proposed in the honor of longtime Bethel pastor  Marc Sherrod.

    The first step is through the city council.

  • Room at new jail means greater likelihood of incarceration

    By DAMON LAWRENCE

    dlawrence@roanecounty.com

    Overcrowding has kept some Roane County lawbreakers out of jail. Sheriff Jack Stockton said that won’t be the case once the county’s new jail opens.

    “The criminals that have warrants on them and things of that nature, they better beware because we have a place to put them now,” Stockton said.

    Overcrowding at the old jail kept the county in bad standing with the state.

  • Mystery tinge in Kingston water gets closer look

    By TERRI LIKENS

    tlikens@roanecounty.com

    Some Kingston residents are seeing red over the state of their water.

    They aren’t mad — just concerned over the pinkish rings left behind water is left standing overnight.

    The issue was raised Tuesday at the Kingston Water Board meeting.

    City Manager Jim Pinkerton said officials are looking into the problem.

    “We’re now flushing in some of those areas twice a week,” he said.

  • Homeschooling gets high marks by some

    By DAMON LAWRENCE

    dlawrence@roanecounty.com

    In Sue Watson’s household, the kitchen table is not just for eating.

    It is also a classroom.

    Watson said that’s where a typical homeschool day starts for her two sons, Trevor and Taylor.

    “Since my children are around the same age, we can approach a lot of the subjects together like history, economics, government, religion and science,” Watson said. “We’ll go through this stuff right here at the table.”