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Local News

  • Harriman attorney faces additional disciplinary action

    The Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility has filed another petition for discipline against Harriman attorney Donice Butler. This one is over comments she made to the Roane County News in April, when she alleged the hearing panel members that ruled in her previous disciplinary case were bought off by the board.

    “Ms. Butler’s statements were made with reckless disregard for truth or falsity in that she had no evidence that any type of compensation was paid to the hearing panel members in exchange for a favorable ruling,” the petition said.

  • Crematory owner indicted for drugs

    A woman facing charges in Morgan County over a pet crematorium now faces legal trouble in Roane County.

    Cameo Andrea Farr was indicted by the Roane County grand jury on Oct. 20 for sale and delivery of a Schedule II drug.

  • Webinar gives tips on continuity plan

    Failure to inform and prepare employees for disasters is one of many common mistakes entrepreneurs make when doing business continuity planning. Not being adequately insured is another oversight that can lead to the failure of your business. Get free tips on ways to avoid these and other costly errors at a free webinar hosted by Agility Recovery and the U.S. Small Business Administration on Tuesday, Dec. 9. True stories about business owners' pre-disaster missteps, plans not followed and lessons learned will also be discussed.

  • Beer licenses could be yanked for noise

    Kingston City Council members hope they’ve solved an ongoing noise problem with an ordinance change that will allow officials to punish noise offenders where it hurts.

    Council passed on second reading Nov. 11 a measure that links the city’s noise ordinance with its beer ordinance.

    What it means is that noisy nightspots will have to turn the volume down when the peace of neighboring residents is threatened or else face more serious sanctions.

  • Collections scam targeting VEC

    Volunteer Energy Cooperative is warning its ratepayers that callers claiming to be with the cooperative’s collections department are scam artists. Businesses have reported receiving calls from individuals who say their power will be disconnected if they do not pay immediately by purchasing a cash card.

    “VEC does not make these types of collections calls,” stressed Robert McCarty, VEC communications coordinator. “Customers should be advised to call law enforcement immediately.”

  • Midway High takes care of soldier alumni

    Thirteen Midway High School graduates serving in the armed forces will be getting care packages from their alma mater.

    The  special deliveries were a labor of love from students of each first period class at Midway High School.

    “It is just really good to be helping out somebody, especially that we know,” said Daxia Shultz.

    “We do a service project every year, and this is one we thought would be good for all the service members we have here,” said teacher Whitney Moore. She said they have 17 more boxes to do in the spring.

  • Former resident judging bull riding

    Former Roane Countian George Carathers has gone from riding the bulls to judging the bull riding technique of others.

    He was just 19 when the rodeo snagged him.

    “I found a practice pen where cowboys go to practice riding bulls and was hooked after the first one,” Carathers said. He was riding competitively soon after.

  • Natural gas rates up for Rockwood

    Rockwood Water, Sewer and Natural Gas is looking at a new rate structure for gas customers. That means an increase for its customers when bills come out this week.

    Public accountant Daniel Peterson presented his recommendation to the utility board to adopt a new methodology to address the difference between the price of gas and the actual revenue the utility makes.

  • County may help vets buy new van

    Roane County leaders could provide some help to Disabled American Veterans Post 86’s effort to get a new van. The county’s Non-Profit Committee met Monday and voted to donate $5,000 to the cause.

    “It was all positive,” Commissioner Darryl Meadows said, about the discussion that took place before the vote.

  • Ministry combines women, art

    On a typical Sunday at Bethel Presbyterian Church in Kingston a large crowd gathers to worship and the sound of gospel music can be heard.

    But on Mondays, there is a different tune.

    A group of about 12 women meet for the Bethel Arts Ministry, or as they like to call it — BAM — and work on different art pieces each week.

    Along with working on art projects “we also tell what’s going on in our lives and gossip,” Cathy McDowell said.