.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Voting machines locked, loaded for elections

    Ninety machines residents will use to cast ballots for the Aug. 7 election were programmed Wednesday.

    “You all have the longest ballot that maybe I’ve ever seen down here this time,” Casey Hayden with Harp Enterprises said.   Harp provides election support for 34 counties in Tennessee.

  • Kingston gives thought to noisy bar problems

    Kingston City Council members plan to stay quiet about noise for another month.

    After a period of reflection and study, they hope to come back in August with some needed tweaks to the city’s noise ordinance, which is a subject of debate once again after causing a stir in 2012.

    The problems have arisen in the same neighborhood that was the source of complaints two years ago.

  • Oliver Springs fined $175,000+

    Oliver Springs, a town once renowned for healthful waters, has been slammed with fines for releasing poorly treated sewage into its main creek.

    Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation has levied more than $175,000 in damages and penalties for violations of the Water Quality Control Act.

  • Contaminated site set for cleanup

    Harriman officials can look forward to seeing a final cleanup of contaminants at the paper mill property.

    “The (U.S.) EPA has contracted with a contractor to clean up this site,” said Councilman Buddy Holley. “They said they’d be done within the year.”

    Holley has been the most vocal about the site, which was once operated by Mead Corp., followed by a few other companies.

    “Mead Corp. has private contractors cleaning up their part,” added Holley. “Mead is cleaning up most of it.”

  • Swan Pond Road work to remove concrete barriers

    STAFF REPORTS

    As cleanup from the 2008 ash spill winds down, TVA will be temporarily closing one lane of Swan Pond Road the week of July 14 to remove concrete barriers and install guardrails next to the Kingston recovery site.

    The work is expected to last about one week.

    The lane closure will take place between the intersection with Swan Pond Circle extending south toward the plant entrance.

    Crews will be using flags at either end of the closure to direct traffic during that time.

  • Controversial development up for first reading vote

    Having passed the city planning commission, discussion of a proposed rezoning to enable a major development off North Kentucky Street came before Kingston City Council at its work session last week.

    And just like at the aforementioned planning meeting, a group of concerned citizens from the affected neighborhoods expressed skepticism about the proposal.

    The development, proposed by property owners Steve Kirkham and Jerry Duncan, would include a Ford dealership, and possibly a big-box store, plus some other retail, on a 47-acre parcel.

  • EPA offers list of summer tips

    Planning fun summer activities, such as beach trips, hiking, and gardening? Follow U.S. Environmental Protection Agency tips — good for your health, your wallet, and your environment.

    Air Quality

  • McFarland turns to PR firm in race

    Tom McFarland has retained the services of a Chattanooga public relations firm to assist him in the race for 9th Judicial District circuit court judge.

    When the Roane County News attempted to contact McFarland last week, Robin Smith of SmithWaterhouse responded on his behalf.  

    “Mr. McFarland has requested that any inquiries on behalf of the Roane County News be directed to me,” Smith said by email.

  • Backpacks help feed hungry kids

    Many Roane County school children go home each weekend during the school year with a backpack full of foods.

    That’s thanks to a Second Harvest of East Tennessee program and the donations of local organizations and people, like Kingston dentist James Walmsley.

    “For me, with having three kids of our own, the thought of having to see my kid be hungry, or if they ask for something and not having it, that just breaks my heart,” said Shannon Walmsley, the office manager and wife of the dentist.

  • Mourning mom wants to help others with loss

    On Aug. 2 2011, a seemingly healthy 21-year-old man never awakened, dying in his sleep from an undetected heart defect.

    Melissa Childs isn’t over the loss of her son, Josh Humphreys, and she doesn’t know if she ever will. She does know something that helped her, and she wants to share that blessing in Roane County.

    She wants to start a local chapter of Listening Hearts, a support group for bereaved mothers.

    “These ladies have helped me tremendously,” she said. “Even if I can help one person, that is my goal.”