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State of Tennessee

  • Extreme heat deadly for kids left in cars

    On an 80-degree day, the temperature inside a locked vehicle increases 19 degrees in just 10 minutes.

    The numbers jump as the minutes pass — to 29 degrees in 20 minutes; and 43 degrees in an hour.  

    The experience could prove fatal for any human subjected to such excessive extremes.

    A child’s body temperature increases 3 to 5 times faster than that of an adult, and children exposed to extreme temperatures can suffer heatstroke, brain damage and death.

  • Ready for the exam? Take a test run at it on state website

    There seems to be a test for everything these days.

    Students and people who are changing careers are especially challenged with stressful — and at times overwhelming — required tests.

    The Tennessee Electronic Library can help. TEL is available to everyone in Tennessee and provides the tools needed to prepare for a variety of exams and take studying to the next level.

  • Voters offered free photo ID

    A new law has recently been passed that requires registered voters to show valid government identification with a photograph in order to vote starting Jan. 1, 2012.

    This ID can include Tennessee driver’s license, passport, military ID or other valid state or federal government issued ID with a photograph.

    “If you cannot afford an ID, one will be provided to you free of charge, for the purposes of voting only, at the nearest Tennessee driver testing center,” said state Rep. Julia Hurley, R-Lenoir City.

  • Still time for stewardship nominees

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation is inviting Tennesseans to submit nominations for the Governor’s 2011 Environmental Stewardship Awards.

    The awards recognize Tennesseans who go above and beyond to protect the state’s diverse environment.

    “Tennesseans continue to make great strides in protecting our environment, taking care of our air, land and water through innovation and hard work,” said Gov. Bill Haslam.  

  • Tennesseans can guitar their car and help music education

    No U.S. state even comes close to Tennessee’s musical significance and global influence.

    From the Mississippi River through Music City, U.S.A. to the Appalachian Trail, the sounds of Tennessee’s blues, rock, country, soul, rockabilly, Bluegrass, rhythm and blues, gospel and other musical influences have changed the cultural complexion of an entire planet.

    The only options for Tennessee music lovers to tag their cars, however, were for Elvis Presley fans and a purple cat playing a saxophone.

    Until now.

  • Teachers asked to TELL

    Gov. Bill Haslam and the Tennessee Department of Education encourages educators to participate in the TELL Tennessee Survey.

    The TELL — or Teaching, Empowering, Leading, and Learning — survey is the first statewide opportunity for teachers and licensed staff in Tennessee to provide input on their learning environment.

    The survey continues through March 11.

    School-based licensed educators may anonymously and voluntarily share their perceptions of the teaching and learning environment in their school.

  • State seeks environmental achievers

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation welcomes the public to submit nominations for the Governor’s 2011 Environmental Stewardship Awards.

    The awards recognize Tennesseans who go above and beyond to protect the state’s diverse environment.

    “Tennesseans continue to make great strides in protecting our environment, taking care of our air, land and water through innovation and hard work,” said Gov. Bill Haslam.

  • General Assembly streaming available on secondary PBS channel

    Televised proceedings of the Tennessee Senate and House of Representatives is now being broadcast statewide on public TV’s Tennessee Channel.

    The gavel-to-gavel broadcast will feature comprehensive live and taped-delayed proceedings, including committee meetings, floor sessions, and other joint conventions for the first time in state history.

  • Hurley plans Feb. 5 open house

    New state Rep. Julia C. Hurley, right, has been listening to constituents such as Lynn Farnham since she was elected to the post in November.

    Hurley welcomes the public to her first open house from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 5 in her new legislative district office in Harriman’s Temperance Building. Light refreshments will be served.

    The public is welcome to stop by and express any concerns and ask questions before the Tennessee General Assembly convenes on Feb. 7.

  • Tour Tennessee with Official Vacation Guide

    Want to see all there is to see in Tennessee? Check out the new Tennessee Official Vacation Guide.

    This year’s glossy magazine-style guide features special editorial spotlights on Tennessee’s 150th commemoration of the American Civil War, Bright Lights & Big Cities, Main Streets & Small Towns and African-American Influences.

    The Discover Tennessee Trails and Byways initiative is covered in a special five-page spread with additional editorial highlights including Dining and Culinary and Tennessee Spirits.