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Today's News

  • Arby’s food truck a hit

    Roane Countians like roast beef.

    When the Arby’s franchise in Knoxville parked a food truck in Midtown Wednesday, people — hundreds at a time — stood on hot pavement in snaking lines, waiting to order. Some brought their children. Several brought their dogs.

    One Wendy’s employee waited clad in her work uniform.

    Did she feel guilty about that?

    “Not in the least,” she said.

    Michael and Amy Daugherty drove from Rockwood for a chance at some different fast-food fare.

  • Money for ‘God’ plaques slow to come

    Roane County Trustee Wilma Eblen said her office has received $1,300 for the “In God We Trust” resolution the County Commission approved on July 14 — significantly less than what officials said was needed.

    The resolution calls for the phrase to be posted over the north and south entrances of the courthouse and in the commission meeting room.

    Commissioner Randy Ellis, the sponsor of the resolution, said the cost to post the phrase at those locations will be about $4,200.

  • Oliver Springs’ colorful past captured in glass

    Oliver Springs Historical Society captured the city’s rich history in an elaborately colorful way.

    Above the entry into the society’s home in the Abston Building ― which has had lives as a theater and garage ― it’s a stained-glass image of long-gone Oliver Springs Hotel.

    “It is way over 1,000 pieces. Even the fence, every little fence (post) is a piece,” said Eddie Coker, a part of the historical society. The design accurately depicts the hotel and nearby surroundings.

  • Moral Week of Action focus is equality

    The Roane County Branch of the NAACP held a news conference Wednesday announcing the statewide Moral Week of Action.

    The seven consecutive days of action across the state was to expose and challenge the laws, ordinances, policies and practices that are oppressing the people of Tennessee.

    “We are sick and tired of being sick and tired,” said Joe Eskridge, Roane County NAACP president.

    The Roane County group’s news conference followed one in Nashville the week before.

  • Pemberton’s swearing-in will be Sunday

    Between judge school, winding down his law practice and dealing with a new lawsuit, the weeks following the Aug. 7 election have been busy for 9th Judicial District Circuit Court Judge-elect Mike Pemberton.

    “I’m as busy now as I was before the election,” Pemberton said.

    Pemberton will take a break from the hectic schedule Sunday afternoon, so he can be sworn in.

    He plans to take his oath with other Roane County elected officials during a 2:30 p.m. swearing-in ceremony at the courthouse.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET: Do we want Roane students at bottom of barrel?

    Perceptive reader, you have, no doubt, observed that many of life’s events, happenings, achievements, etc. occur in series of threes.

  • Roane ACT scores drop, state scores rise

    Roane County Schools’ recent performance on the ACT came under fire during a County Commission workshop last week.

    The average score for Roane County students in 2013 was 19.2. It dropped to 18.8 this year.

    “We were very disappointed in our ACT tests,” Director of Schools Gary Aytes said of the outcome.

    “That particular class (last year’s juniors) last year has been kind of a thorn in our side ever since they were in third grade coming up,” Aytes said. “That happens.”

  • River Road ATV chase ends in crash, charges

    A man who was injured during a July police chase on a four-wheeler turned himself in on Aug. 18.

    Albert Childs is charged with DUI, driving with a revoked license, felony evading arrest, possession of a handgun while under the influence and operating an ATV on the highway.

    According to the warrant, sheriff’s deputies responded to the area of River Road and Blue Springs Circle at 11 p.m. on July 28 in response to a call about a four-wheeler disturbance.

  • Victim removal training
  • $500,000 voting-machine bill?

    The need for election accountability may cost Roane Countians big — as much as $500,000.

    And that’s with the state chipping in.

    An election paper trail means Roane County could have to purchase new voting machines in the next few years. Even with the state chipping in, Administrator of Elections Charles Holiway estimated the cost for the county could run as high as $500,000.