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Today's News

  • No injuries in bus collision with teen

    A teen driver crashed into a Roane County school bus Thursday afternoon.

    None of the 26 students who were on the bus suffered injuries, according to the Tennessee Highway Patrol, which investigated the crash.

    It happened on Dogwood Drive around 4 p.m. According to the report, 18-year-old Derek A. Bailey of Kingston was traveling north in a 2004 Oldsmobile Alero when he crossed the centerline and struck the school bus.

  • Rockwood firefighters take up teaching

    Rockwood Fire Department is investing in training its employees.

    Many of them recently went to different instructor schools, so the training should pay off with future savings in the department.

    “Some of this is stuff we are required to do every year or every other year, and we have been having to outsource it to get somebody to come in here and do the training for us,” said Rockwood Fire Chief Matt Crabtree.

  • Eight years’ probation sentence of man pleading to child neglect

    Multiple “roadblocks” hampered the prosecution of a Kingston man who was indicted in 2015 on four counts of aggravated child abuse.

    The case against Dakota Cain Lamping ended on Friday when he pleaded guilty to an amended charge of attempted aggravated child neglect.

    Criminal Court Judge Jeff Wicks sentenced him to eight years of state probation. He was also fined $150 and ordered to pay the court costs. The remaining charges were dismissed.

  • Garden vandalized at Riverfront Park

    The Harriman Garden Club found a sorry sight at the garden they have at David Webb’s Riverfront Park.

    Someone vandalized the garden that the members devote so much time to. A bird bath bowl, the tops of concrete benches, stepping stones and flowers were all removed from the garden.

    “This is the third year in a row we have been vandalized. The first time they stole a beautiful bird bath,” said club member Pat Ramsey. “It just makes you mad.”

  • SITTING PRETTY
  • Harriman considers public safety director

    Harriman is considering creating a public safety director position to oversee both police and fire.

    Harriman City Manager Kevin Helms said he felt this would be the best time to try such a proposal because of the employees the city has on staff.

    “If I didn’t think we had the right people in place right now I wouldn’t be talking about this,” said Helms.

    Councilman Lonnie Wright agreed with the quality of the city’s staff.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET: Make Rockwood’s High School Great Again!

    Gentle reader, we read, as we suspect you did also, Mr. Paul Kamikawa’s letter published in last Friday’s News, written, he says, in response to our recent articles, particularly as to Rockwood High School’s status in general, and ACT score performance in particular.

  • FSA offering targeted loans for underserved, beginning farmers

    USDA Tennessee Farm Service Agency offers targeted farm ownership and farm operating loans to assist underserved applicants as well as beginning farmers and ranchers.
    “Each year, a portion of FSA’s loan funds are set aside to lend to targeted underserved and beginning farmers and ranchers,” said  FSA Acting Executive Director, Tyeisha Samples.

  • Save room for Lions pancakes

    The Harriman Lions Club is gearing up for its annual fundraiser, “World’s Greatest Pancake Breakfast” to help fund its many charities.

    The breakfast will be from 7 to 11 a.m. May 6 in Roane Street Grill at 812 N. Roane St., Harriman.

    Generous portions of pancakes, bacon, sausage, eggs, coffee, orange juice and milk will be available for $8 for adults, $15 for couples and $4 for ages 10 and younger.

    The Harriman Lions Club has provided exams and glasses for many people over the last 60 years.

  • Ready. Aim. FIRE!

    You never know what life has in store.

    For Brant Williams, his life has taken some turns over the past 25 years that have led to him owning a successful gun store at 1218 Gallaher Road near Kingston.

    “My dad and I had bought the campground in ’91 or ’92 for my brother to run,” Williams said. “He (brother) was getting sick and my parents were getting older so I moved back here (from Atlanta) in 1994. In ’98 my brother died, and I had to take over the campground.”