Today's News

  • Christmas Ideas Fair starts Thursday

    Today is Halloween, but members of the Roane County Family and Community Education Clubs are thinking about Christmas — the Christmas Ideas Fair, that is.

    This year’s two-day extravaganza will be from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Nov. 1 and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 2 in Kingston Community Center.

    Breakfast and lunch will be available each day, and dinner will be available on Thursday.

    New to this year’s Ideas Fair are Gifts in a Jar and a Christmas General Store.

  • Walk, 5K to aid schools

    Roane County Schools Coordinated School Health Program’s fourth annual 5K race/walk will be on Nov. 3 at Fort Southwest Point, Kingston.

    Medals will be awarded in all age groups, with male and female categories in each division. Entry fee is $25 for adults; student entry fee is $10. The walking division will begin at 8:30 a.m., with runners to start at 9; registration tables will open at 7:30. Registration forms are available at roaneschools.com or from Patti Wells at 882-3700, Ext. 1910, or pawells@roaneschools.com.

  • Mr. & Mrs. Hall 60th

    Mr. and Mrs. Luther S. Hall of Oliver Springs are celebrating their 60th wedding anniversary today, Oct. 31.

    Hall and the former Dorothy Sisson were married on Oct. 31, 1952, in Oliver Springs First Baptist Church.

  • Margaret Rae “Maggie” Murrell

    Margaret Rae “Maggie” Murrell was born Oct. 11 in Medina, Ohio.

    She weighed 7 pounds, 11 ounces and was 19 inches long.

    She is the daughter of Christopher G. and Whitney Julian Murrell of Medina.

    Grandparents are Homer Julian of Rockwood and the late Carol Julian, and Gene and Ginny Murrell of Spring City.

    Great-grandmother is Ruby Julian of Harriman.

    Maggie has a 3-year-old brother, Charlie.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of Oct. 31

    25 Years Ago
    Best-selling author and columnist Erma Bom-beck was in Oak Ridge for a book signing. La-

  • Special wall pays homage to veterans

    About 30 percent of Victorian Square’s residents are veterans, and the assisted-living facility in Rockwood has developed a special wall to honor them.

    “We are blessed to have so many people living with us who served our country,” said Kelly Gibson, Victorian Square’s director of business development. “We want to show appreciation for them on a daily basis. This wall serves that purpose.”

  • Free driver safety course offered for vets in November

    In recognition of the dedication and service veterans have given to this country, they and their families are offered opportunities to take the AARP Driver Safety Training Course for free in November.

    The promotional offer is available to all military personnel who serve or have served in the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, National Guard/Reserves or Coast Guard.

    Dependents, including spouses/domestic partners, widows/widowers and children, are also eligible to take advantage of this promotion.

  • The Garden Gate: Fearsome plants haunt us all the year through

    Fearsome plants abound in Halloween lore and call to mind the legend of a poison garden rumored to have been part of the estate of Italy’s famous Borgia family in the 16th century, a time when poisoning was the preferred way of dealing with enemies and worrisome competitors.

  • GUEST OPINION: Mug shot sites show complexity of freedom, law

    First Amendment Center
    You can’t put a price on justice — but some are trying to charge a fee to fix what others call an injustice.

    There’s nothing good about getting arrested, even if the charges are dismissed or you’re found innocent at trial. The same goes for having a “mug shot” — a photo made at a jail or holding area — taken and filed with a county lockup or police department, complete with ID information.

  • Artificial cave could save Tenn. bats

    The Nature Conservancy
    Halloween conjures frightening images of bats emerging from dark caves looking for human blood.

    In reality, as the trick-or-treating begins, bats are settling into caves where they’ll hibernate for the winter and face something far scarier.

    White-nose syndrome, a deadly disease caused by the fungus Geomyces destructans, affects hibernating bats and has killed more than 5.5 million across 19 states since 2006.