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Today's News

  • Slow start costs Kingston

    Kingston’s unbeaten season came to a close Friday night as the Jackets spotted the Lenoir City Panthers a 21-7 halftime lead and fell 28-20  despite a fourth quarter rally.

  • Harriman bombs Jellico, 46-0

    In a "Battle Of The Blue Devils", it was total domination by the Harriman Blue Devils over Jellico, winning 46-0 Friday night at Wallace Black Field. 

  • Who caused Rockwood's utility mess?

    Robert Duane Pawley may not know who is to blame for the financial crisis facing Rockwood Water, Sewer and Natural Gas.

    He’s very clear, however, on who is not.

    “I do not see a valid reason why the consumer should have to pay the ticket for bad management, other than the fact that somebody’s got to pay,” the Chamberlain Avenue resident said. “To put the full burden on the citizens, I think, is improper and inappropriate.”

  • County budget committee gets back to work

    The budget committee had a lengthy discussion about Roane County’s proposed budget for the 2010-11 fiscal year on Monday.   

    New County Executive Ron Woody said the budget was put together by the budget committee that existed before he took office on Sept. 1.  

    Two members of the current budget committee, commissioners Bobby Collier and Ron Berry, also served on the previous one.  

  • LOOSELEAF LAUREATE: A perfect weekend can last and last

    Summer, going into fall, is my favorite time of year. This year, the transition season seemed to reward me for my loyalty.

    For months, I’d had an outing planned — one that involved a river, the mountains and a tiny town tucked between them.

    I rallied a few friends to come along and then braced myself — knowing full well that when the designated weekend arrived, we would be rained out.

    Even when the forecasts called for perfect weather, I shrugged.

    I knew there would be a hitch.

  • EPA sets details for Knoxville hearing on ash

    Summer, going into fall, is my favorite time of year. This year, the transition season seemed to reward me for my loyalty.

    For months, I’d had an outing planned — one that involved a river, the mountains and a tiny town tucked between them.

    I rallied a few friends to come along and then braced myself — knowing full well that when the designated weekend arrived, we would be rained out.

    Even when the forecasts called for perfect weather, I shrugged.

    I knew there would be a hitch.

  • Stop sign confusion reigns in Rockwood

    It’s been a stop-and-go kind of summer for Rockwood’s Strang Street and Kingston Avenue intersection.

    Stop signs were removed from Kingston Avenue earlier this year to make the crossing a two-way stop on Strang Street and help the flow of traffic.

    The measure was short-lived: Rockwood City Council voted Monday to replace those Kingston Avenue signs and restore the intersection to its former four-way-stop status.

  • Pray to stay: B&B opens in Oliver Springs church

    A beautiful house of worship is getting new life as a different sort of home in Oliver Springs.

    The Windmill Inn, a large bed-and-breakfast, is in what was once the Beech Park Baptist Church.

    A windmill now adorns the front of the building, and plans to remove the church steeple and replace it with a windmill are in the works.

    Inside, the sanctuary has been converted into a large living room and large wood shutters can be shut to block the brilliant rays of light streaming through the stained glass windows.

  • A View From Lick Skillet by Gerald Largen

    Gentle reader, as we enter the autumn season, most educational institutions begin a new academic year.

    Although President Obama has initiated efforts to reform our institutions of higher learning from the community colleges to the most prestigious universities, regrettably it is unlikely that the entering freshmen will find his lot substantially improved over that of his older fellows.

    Costs continue to escalate at a totally unreasonable rate, and the value of a degree continues to decline.

  • Rockwood's pain a reflection of tough times

    Rockwood city officials are finding themselves in the unenviable position of possibly raising property taxes, and more probably, water rates in tight times.

    Many government entities are pinching their budgets as grants dry up and state and federal funding is diminished.

    Rockwood has taken pride in its relatively
    low tax rate, but sometimes increases really are necessary.