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Today's News

  • Houston brothers together again – in Bluegrass State

    Brothers Rocky and Leon Houston no longer live on the same Roane County farm, but they are in the same state.

    The Federal Bureau of Prisons has both serving time at facilities in Kentucky.

    Rocky is incarcerated at the Federal Correctional Institution in Ashland — a low-security institution with an adjacent minimum security satellite camp.

    Rocky, 53, was found guilty in March of being a convicted felon in possession of firearms. He received a nine-year sentence. The Federal Bureau of Prisons list his release date as Nov. 13, 2020.

  • Kingston rezoning passes

    If there were any lingering doubts as to why a full house turned out for the Aug. 12 Kingston City Council meeting, they were dispelled when most of the attendees left, en masse, midway through the agenda.

    That was after council members passed the second reading of an ordinance rezoning a 47-acre parcel off North Kentucky Street, clearing a path for a proposed new Kingston Pointe development featuring a car dealership, big-box store and other retail outlets.

  • Sampson winding down term

    Harriman Councilman J.D. Sampson cares about his city.

    His fellow council members recognized that when they expressed their pleasure in serving with him over the years.

    Sampson, after 10 years on the council, lost re-election last week.

    “We do appreciate his service,” said Councilman Lonnie Wright. “There is no doubt where J.D.’s heart lies.”

    “... and I really do appreciate his colorful commentary over the years ― most of it,” Wright quipped.

  • Harriman starts city manager search process

    Harriman officials kicked off the start of their search for a city manager this week and may have someone on board by October.

    Harriman City Council met in workshop session with Municipal Technical Advisory Service consultant Warren Nevad, who discussed the intent to follow a search process like MTAS did with Kingston.

    Kingston’s search, after the retirement of manager Jim Pinkerton, resulted in the hiring of David Bolling last year.

  • TWRA leasing dove fields

     

    The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency is seeking fields to lease for the upcoming 2014 dove season. The first segment of dove season opens at noon on Monday, Sept. 1.

  • Jackets battle Dragons, injuries in final scrimmage

     

    After a cancellation last Friday, the York Institute Dragons did fulfill their scheduled visit to Kingston for a scrimmage on Tuesday. 

    Kingston was outscored 5-2 in the scrimmage, but Yellow Jacket coach Brian Pankey was encouraged by some phases of his team. 

  • Jamborees highlight weekend football schedule

     

    Area football fans will get their fill this weekend as Oliver Springs will host the 2014 Roane County Football Jamboree Friday evening featuring all five county high school teams. 

  • Register for continued learning classes

    Want to see 10 award-winning films from 10 countries? Find genealogy information on the Internet? Learn about female Pharaohs in ancient Egypt?

    Better understand tax law changes, Medicare, long-term care services and investment fundamentals? Get a new perspective on Jesus, the Trinity and the Quakers? Learn to analyze dreams and play better bridge?

    Courses on these and other topics will be offered during the fall semester of Oak Ridge Institute for Continued Learning.

  • Regional museum directors to talk at OR gathering

    The city of Oak Ridge and the American Museum of Science and Energy Foundation will have the second in a series of community meetings from 6 to 8 p.m. Aug. 19.

    The meeting will be in the museum at 300 S. Tulane Ave., Oak Ridge.

    Registration and light refreshments will be available beginning at 5:30 p.m.

    Executives from several regional museums and attractions will discuss how their museums were established and developed, and how each is managed and operated.

  • Curvy cuke would be big pickle

    Joyce Sapp likes cucumbers, and she grew them this summer in her yard on Post Oak Road near Rockwood.

    But she recently decided she’d had her fill for the summer. While getting rid of the vines, she found her biggest harvest of all — a green, curved cuke that measures 18 inches long if measured end to end inside the curve.

    “I wasn’t trying to grow anything other than cucumbers,” she said of her late-summer find. “At any rate, it’s the biggest one I’ve ever seen.”