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Today's News

  • AGILE ANIMALS
  • Gooch retires, but will keep on laughing

    Sears staff and customers will miss the warmth of the Harriman’s store’s oldest employee.

    June Gooch retired last week after 33 years at the store — and a previous five years at Sears when it was across from the Princess Theatre in downtown Harriman.  

    “Eighty-two years old, and she’s still a firecracker,” said Charlie Jones, who owns the Sears store today.

    It’s her spirit that keeps her going.

  • Kingston sizes up ‘image-repair’ funds

    Kingston city officials soberly deliberated last week how to spend the last of TVA’s reparations.

    What’s left is $375,000 designated by TVA for image repair from damage from the 2008 TVA Kingston Fossil Plant ash spill.

    The environmental disaster, proclaimed in news reports worldwide as the largest of its kind, left a lasting stain on the city’s name ― and a big job ahead for the city council.

    “Pretty much everything is open for discussion,” Mayor Tim Neal said at the start of the special-called meeting Friday.

  • Woman found dead at scene of Harriman house fire

    Authorities are withholding the name of a woman who was found dead at the scene of Harriman house fire Monday afternoon.

    The home was at 505 Margrave Drive. Authorities at the scene said they believe the fire started in a bedroom.

    “As of right now, it apparently seems to be an accidental fire, but we won't know until we get more into the case,” Harriman Police Chief Randy Heidle said.

    Police investigators and the state fire marshals will be investigating, Heidle said.

  • MEMORIES UP IN SMOKE

    Miller & Brewer a shopping tradition
    By CINDY SIMPSON

    csimpson@roanecounty.com

    A relic of Harriman’s once-bustling downtown is now gone.

    The old Miller & Brewer building, as it was called because it once housed a department store of that name, was destroyed by fire Thursday, its walls bulging and then crumbling.

    “It was a happening place back in the ’70s,” said Donnie Hall, a former Harriman resident who was one of many sharing recollections of the store during its glory years.

  • Midway closes out season on high note

    The Midway Middle School Lady Green Waves lost their first and only game of the year on Jan. 5 at Wartburg. But the Lady Waves picked up the pieces and blew through the last six games of the season to finish with a 17-1 record and the number one seed in the area 4AA tournament.

    The Lady Waves will play their first game Saturday at 3:30 against the winner of the Rockwood/Harriman match up.

  • Lady Cats take care of Sunbright

    It was business as usual for the Lady Bobcats Tuesday night at Sunbright.

    After getting out to an early lead over the Lady Tigers, Oliver Springs cruised to a 48-28 victory.

    “It was a win, that’s about all I can say,” Lady Bobcats head coach Michelle Christopher said.

    “I guess a big plus for my kids is the effort. They definitely missed a lot of shots they normally hit, but they just kept working hard and getting after it. That’s what I always teach them no matter what.”

  • Technical fouls cost Oliver Springs boys against Sunbright

    It nearly took an extra quarter of basketball Tuesday night to determine a winner between Oliver Springs and Sunbright.

    However, a technical foul called on Shelby Morgan with three-tenths of a second left on the clock gave Noah Freels and the Tigers enough of a chance to end the game in regulation with a 64-62 victory.

  • An open letter to sports parents

    Dear sports parents, this is an intervention.

    Not for all of you, though. In fact, many of you are free to go but I would advise reading hanging around to read the rest of this. If for nothing else the fact you can point and laugh at the others next time you’re at a game.

    No, I’m not writing this for the normal supporter of their child’s athletic endeavors (no matter how bad they may be).

  • Luminary United Methodist plans Jan. 25 healing service

    Thanks in part to televangelists, Christian worship services centered on healing have gotten a bad rap in recent years.

    “We need to learn to re-embrace this tradition,” said Chuck Griffin, pastor of Luminary United Methodist Church in Ten Mile.

    “Christ healed people as evidence of the kingdom’s presence in this world,” Griffin said, “and Christ continues to heal through the Holy Spirit today.”