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Today's News

  • Mother Nature too much for the Devils

    Mother Nature has been a foe for Roane County football this year.

    A week and a half ago, stormy weather caused scrimmages to be postponed and cancelled. The same things happened again last Friday as a number of pre-season matchups were at the mercy of the elements.

    The Harriman Blue Devils hosted the King’s Academy Lions with the skies heavy with dark, foreboding clouds.

    The teams’ coaches decided to start the scrimmage early in anticipation of the bad weather.

  • Tigers grrreat against Scott

    The Rockwood Tigers put together a solid performance in Huntsville Friday evening, as John Webb’s squad scored three touchdowns without yielding any in a scrimmage with Scott High.

    “I thought we did a lot of good things, but we still have a lot to work on,” Webb said. “One thing about it is that we had great effort. We messed up a few assignments, but overall we got something to work with. If these kids keep playing hard, they’re going to get better day in and day out.”

  • GLIMPSES: Conflict again a complication

    By Mark Banker

    During World War II, Winston Churchill reportedly observed: “Americans will always do the right thing – after exhausting all the alternatives.”

    Whether the British statesmen uttered those exact words is debatable. But we might all hope that this realistic appraisal will someday be appropriate for our own present chapter in history.

  • Aim for the sky at OS festival

    Nestled at the foot of Windrock Mountain, the sleepy little town of Oliver Springs has the distinction of being located in part of three counties.

    Often feeling they struggle to be recognized, the town’s Historical Society has been restoring a 1928 garage to house a museum and event center.

    Like “OZ,” Roane County’s “OS” has its own movie, “October Sky.”

  • MTSU expert to meet with heritage group in Oak Ridge

    Lydia Simpson, programs manager for Middle Tennessee State University’s Center for Historic Preservation, will speak during the next meeting of the Oak Ridge Heritage and Preservation Association.

    The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. Aug. 10 in Midtown Community Center at 102 Robertsville Road, Oak Ridge.

    Heritage and science tourism are extremely important for Oak Ridge. In her job, Simpson manages the department’s public programming and outreach, with particular involvement with CHP digital platform initiatives.

  • Join Lions for dinner theater

    “Murder in the End Zone,” a special Harriman Lions Club dinner theater/tailgate party in commemoration of the organization’s 100th anniversary, will begin at 7 p.m. Aug. 26 in the Harriman American Legion Hall at 624 Morgan St.

    Tickets are $40 per person and include a tailgate dinner buffet, dessert bar and interactive murder mystery.

    A silent auction is also planned.

    Tickets may be purchased at The Roane Alliance at 1209 N. Kentucky St., Kingston.

  • Kingston serves v’ball action
  • Largen appeals annexation suit with Harriman

    Gerald Largen has not given up his fight against the city of Harriman just yet.

    The retired attorney and Harriman landowner is appealing the rulings of Roane County Circuit Court Judge Mike Pemberton, who dismissed Largen’s suit to void the city’s decades-old annexation into South Harriman.

    “That will be developing in the coming weeks with the [Tennessee] Court of Appeals,” said Harriman City Attorney Allison Rehn.

    Rehn is not representing the city in this case. Attorney Michael Kelley is.

  • Festival to celebrate naturalist’s trek

    Roane County Tourism and the City of Kingston will be hosting an event next month to commemorate the 150th anniversary of naturalist John Muir’s visit to the area.

    The Muir Festival at Fort Southwest Point on Sept. 9 will feature music, food and educational programs designed to bring attention to environmental issues. 

    Recognized as “The Father of the National Parks System” and the founder of the Sierra Club, Muir passed through Kingston on Sept. 12, 1867 on his 1,000-mile walk from Kentucky to Florida.  

  • What’s the SCORE? by Dana Peterka: Who’s in control of your time? Your life?

    When you allow yourself to be interrupted, while you are doing a task, are you letting others control your priorities?

    Is the interruption of such importance that it requires an immediate response?

    When I see people immediately responding to a phone call, email, instant message or text, I wonder if they are managing themselves or letting others control them. Yes, some phone calls are more important than the task at hand.