Today's News


    Rockwood Fire Department made sure it’s ready to reach those in need with some training on their self-contained breathing apparatus and on low-angle rescue.

    Low-angle rescue is a skill used in scenarios such as reaching a car wreck at the bottom of a steep embankment.

    “It is like rope rescue, but your feet never leaves the ground,” said Fire Chief Matt Crabtree.

    “We probably have somewhere between four to six accidents a year on the highway where they go off to the point we have to have assistance getting there.”

  • Events all weekend long

    From staff reports

    Main events of Rockwood’s 150-anniversary celebration this weekend will center around Rockwood Middle School and Rockwood High School.

    Though Sunday’s free barbecue lunch, birthday cake and dignitaries and key speakers at 2:30 p.m. Sunday is the centerpiece, the celebration takes place all weekend.

    Saturday’s festivities are from 1 to 6 p.m., with music beginning at 10:30 a.m.

    The fun continues on Sunday from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m.

  • Brothers battle, one shot dead

    A man was shot and killed by his brother Monday night.

    The incident happened at 119 Bass Lane, which is South of the River.

    Roane County Sheriff Jack Stockton said an altercation between the brothers preceded the shooting.

    “They got into a fight, a scuffle,” Stockton said. “One of them allegedly picked up a stick, hit the other one or was going to hit the other one, and the other one shot him.”

  • Alliance CEO on school: ‘We have an opportunity to change our culture’

    A K-14 educational curriculum that provides increased emphasis on career readiness is the best remedy for a host of serious problems facing the county, according to Roane Alliance president and CEO Wade Creswell.

    “We have an opportunity to change our culture based on how we teach our children,” Creswell said.

    The K-14 initiative on which the Alliance is embarking would be based on providing college level courses and career technical training to a greater number of high school students.

  • Man given 12 years on 17 cases of burglary

    A serial burglar is facing more than a decade in prison.

    Timothy Shawn Fink, 37, pleaded guilty in 17 separate burglary cases on March 2.

    “The 17 plea agreements that have been handed to me, can you briefly summarize what you’re pleading guilty to,” Criminal Court Judge Jeff Wicks asked Fink at the hearing.

    “It’s my understanding that I’m pleading guilty to the aggravated burglary charges, theft charges,” Fink responded.

  • AAA: Gas prices drop over the weekend

    Tennessee gas prices increased 2 cents last week, before declining a penny during the weekend, AAA reported.

    The state average of $2.32 is 11 cents less than a month ago, yet motorists are paying 25 cents per gallon more than this time last year.

  • Fire determined to be electrical

    Members of the West Roane Fire Volunteer Department, with assistance from the Roane County Office of Emergency Services, responded last week to a fire at the home of Jimmy and Trina Yelvington at 160 Monger Road in Rockwood.

    A passerby saw the fire and called in to 911 at 10:26 a.m. on Feb. 26.

    Upon arrival, according to West Roane Fire Chief Charlie Redwine, the mobile home was heavily involved, with the major part of the blaze coming from the center of the dwelling.

    Firefighters were on scene a little over four hours putting out the fire.

  • Going with the Flo: America’s Pastor was a beacon of integrity

    By Flo Charles

    After 60 years of ministry, Billy Graham’s body was buried Friday, March 2, after the House and Senate both agreed to allow his body to lie in honor at the U.S. Capitol rotunda.

    He is only the fourth citizen to have such an honor. A simple pine box with a cross on top was chosen as a powerful reminder of his simple life; yet he met with every president since World War II, Queen Elizabeth and the beggar on the streets.

  • A View From Lick Skillet: Trump is right protecting steel and aluminum

    Gentle reader, over the years that we have been writing this column, there have been a few times when we have felt a dearth of topics from the preceding week’s news events out of which to select a subject upon which to expound.

    This past week has not been one of those. No, indeed we have been inundated, flooded, overcome, overwhelmed, well-nigh buried with potential topics since we last commented on national affairs, our last two having focused on local or historical matters primarily.