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Today's News

  • Bad inning costs Bobcats

    After dropping a pair of games against Sunbright the week before, the Oliver Springs Bobcats needed a victory over Oneida last Wednesday to get back on track in District 4-A.

  • Headrick’s vehicular homicide case ends in plea

    Nancy Hill turned 64 on June 20, 2011, and had plans to celebrate her birthday with family.
    “She was going home to change clothes to meet the rest of us for a lunch because we always took her out on her birthday,” daughter Lisa Hunter said.
    Hill never made her birthday celebration. She was killed in a head-on car wreck on Gateway Avenue in Rockwood.

  • New enforcer may clean up Harriman

    A new and even tougher method of enforcing building codes and an alternative to the municipal courtroom is being considered to deal with Harriman’s most problematic offenders.
    Building Inspector Maria Nelson brought forward the idea of trying an administrative hearing officer to give the city more options to deal with offenders that continue to violate the city’s building and property maintenance codes.
    “The administrative hearing officer option gives us the option of citing higher fines ...” Nelson said.

  • Survivors get special night out

    Relay for Life is all about celebrating and helping to make more cancer survivors.
    Honoring survivors is an important aspect of Relay for Life, and Roane County’s Relay for Life is doing that with a survivor’s night out Friday, April 12. A reception is from 5 to 6 p.m. at what was the Roane Medical Center annex in downtown Harriman, the corner of light 7 and down from the Princess Theatre.

  • Adding jail cells not the answer to our problem

    Recently, a reader commented that it might be less expensive to taxpayers to just  bail out nonviolent inmates at the county jail rather than pay for food, medical care, lodging and security to hold them for weeks on end.
    We can sympathize.
    Often times, it feels like law-abiding, taxpayers are the real people getting punished  when it comes to the costs of building and maintaining jails.
    We are glad county officials are willing to look more closely at alternatives to lengthy incarcerations.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET: First Amendment doesn’t protect barbarism

    A couple of weeks ago, we asked the question — Isn’t it time we defended our Western heritage? We return to this topic today. As this column is dated 29 March, 2012, which is Good Friday this year, it would seem timely to turn once again to the topic of Religion and the First Amendment to the Constitution, which in this regard says: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof ....”

  • HASLAMCARE

    Instead of expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, Gov. Bill Haslam wants to use the federal money to purchase private health insurance for Tennesseans.
    He explained how his plan would work during an address before the General Assembly on Wednesday.
    “For the last several months I’ve been working toward a Tennessee plan for health reform — to change the way health care coverage looks in Tennessee,” Haslam said.

  • ‘No taxes’ offered to Midtown merchants

    City property taxes may not be quite the worry many Midtown residents thought it would be when battling Harriman leaders against annexation.
    “I can offer you no taxes,” Harriman City Councilman Buddy Holley recently told two Midtown business owners.
    Holley said he’s learned from Municipal Technical Advisory Service the city can offer a contract to residents of future annexed properties to either hold off on paying city taxes for a certain length of time or until the property is sold to another landowner.

  • Easter Blessings
  • Ava Barber to be in Kingston

    Ava Barber, a featured performer on “The Lawrence Welk Show,” will be the guest performer next week during the meeting of Kingston First Baptist Church’s Young at Heart.

    The meeting will begin at 10:30 a.m. April 1 in the church’s family life center at 215 N. Kentucky St.

    The program is open to the public. Those attending are asked to bring a covered dish or dessert for the meal afterward.