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Today's News

  • Goodwill opens Harriman store

    Due to the overwhelming support and business the Rockwood Goodwill Store has received from the Roane County community, Goodwill has expanded to offer an second location in Harriman.

    Goodwill hosted the grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony of its Harriman store on Feb. 9.

    The Harriman store, at 1233 Roane St., offers shoppers a varied selection that includes clothing items, furniture, toys and books. The selection will be replenished daily.

  • Tax refund on its way? There's an app for that

    IRS2Go 2.0, an expanded version of the Internal Revenue Service’s smartphone application, is now available.

    The app is designed to provide taxpayers easier access to practical tools and information.

    The new app, available on the Apple and Android platforms, adds a new YouTube feature, news feed and tax transcript service in addition to existing tools, such as checking on the status of a tax refund.

  • General Sessions Court: Dec. 9, 2011-Jan. 9, 2012

    Editor’s Note: Readers are cautioned that some names may be the same as, or similar to, other members of the community.
    Dec. 12 — Kimberly Dagnan, assault attempt and theft up to $500. Guilty.

    • Curtis C. Lloyd, failure to appear misdemeanor. Dismissed. Public intoxication. Guilty.

    • William Packett, theft of property $60,000 or more. Dismissed. Vandalism $1,000-$10,000 and burglary other than habitation solicitation. Guilty.

  • Donors sought for Tennessee Scholars program

    The Roane County Chamber of Commerce and Roane County Schools have supported the Tennessee Scholars program for several years — but now, they want to kick it up a notch.

    “Last year, 123 graduating seniors from Roane County schools achieved the higher standards of a Tennessee Scholar,” said Allen Lutz, education and workforce specialist for The Roane Alliance.

    “That’s almost a 50 percent increase from the year before, but it is only about one-quarter of all graduating seniors. We can do better.”

  • Cherokee students competing in Middle School Science Bowl

    A team from Kingston’s Cherokee Middle School will compete in the second U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) East Tennessee Middle School Science Bowl.

    The competition begins at 9 a.m. Feb. 25 on the Oak Ridge campus of Roane State Community College.

    Cherokee students are among the East Tennessee middle schoolers who will showcase their science knowledge and could win an all-expense-paid trip to the national competition in Washington, D.C.

  • Donations sought for positive behavior program

    Midway High School Positive Behavior Team, a component of Roane County Schools’ Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support system, is seeking donations of items for incentive rewards.

    Student who show good behavior are rewarded through praise, recognition and “sand dollars” that can be turned in to the school store for rewards.

    Items sought for rewards include nonperishable snacks, T-shirts, school supplies, shoes, coats, jeans, perfume, lotions, tools or other automotive incentives and event tickets.

  • Holy Rollers: One Faith taking up services at skating rink

    For a church without a building, the congregation of Rockwood’s One Faith Community Church has stayed strongly united.

    Once moved from the retail space next to Goody’s, the church later moved to an area of Midtown.

    Its newest home is in a rather unique location: the Roane County Skating Center.

    Skating Center Manager Virgil Thompson is a friend of One Faith Pastor Shawn Hatfield. He has agreed to allow the church to have services at 7 p.m. Thursday and at 11 a.m. Sunday.

  • Paradise Baptist taking One Harvest food orders

    Paradise Baptist Church, Rockwood, is now affiliated with One Harvest Food Ministries to help Roane Countians stretch their food dollars.

  • Spotlight on New Hope Primitive Baptist Church
  • Some expression now unfree after court's ruling

    By Ken Paulson, First Amendment Center
    The Supreme Court just put a price tag on some formerly free speech.

    In a 6-2 vote on Jan. 18, the Court upheld a 1994 law that extended copyright protection to foreign films, books, paintings and other art that had previously been in the public domain and available free to U.S. residents.