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Today's News

  • Churches, Habitat clear lot for future home

    Roane County Habitat for Humanity partners with members of Bradbury United Methodist Church of Kingston and Luminary United Methodist Church of Ten Mile to clear a donated lot in Harriman that someday will hold a Habitat house for a family in need of a decent place to live.

    Dozens of old tires, a decaying fiberglass boat and hundreds of pounds of scrap metal were removed from the lot and either recycled or hauled to the landfill.

  • Rid your home of hazardous waste at special event

    Roane County households may dispose of possible hazardous wastes in a free and safe way during next month’s Household Hazardous Waste Day at the recycling center at 215 White Pine Road, Midtown.

    Household hazardous waste materials will be accepted from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 11. No business, agribusiness, school or church waste will be accepted.

    Household hazardous waste includes flammable, corrosive, reactive or toxic materials.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of April 24

    25 Years Ago
    Walnut Hill Elementary third-grader Sara Haun’s artwork was chosen for two billboards representing Roane Clean Community Systems. “A Beautiful Roane is a Real Pick-Me-Up!” declared the billboards in Harriman and Rockwood. Haun won the privilege of having her artwork so prominently displayed in a poster contest conducted by the anti-litter group.

    10 Years Ago

  • Last chance for ’13 rabies clinics

    The last of Roane County Health Department’s rabies vaccination clinics are planned for this weekend.

    “You are urged to have your dogs and cats vaccinated each year to comply with the Tennessee Rabies Law,” said Preston Woody, environmental health specialist at the Roane County Health Department.

    Vaccinations are $12 each.

    The clinics, from 1 to 2:30 p.m. April 27, will be  at:

    • Animal Medical Center at Ladd Landing, Kingston

  • Ayers, Tech Center given Rotary kudos

    Kingston Rotary Club President Ralph Best, left, presents Chris Ayers, assistant director of Tennessee Technology Center at Harriman, with the club’s Vocational Service Award.

    The award is annually presented to individuals who express the ideals of Rotary and who use vocational knowledge, skills and talents to serve the Roane County community and its people.

  • The Garden Gate: Tiny blueberries score big nutritionally

    Blueberries are wonderful fresh either with or without cream, and irresistible in muffins right out of the oven and pie

    These soft, dark blue, round berries are not only delicious; they also have tremendous medicinal values.

    Scientists in the Laboratory of Neuroscience at the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University have discovered that blueberries have both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds that help neurons in the brain function more effectively.

  • GUEST OPINION: States’ Ag-Gag bill should make us all feel sick

    By KEN PAULSON
    President, First Amendment Center

    Imagine Upton Sinclair with an iPhone.

    Sinclair went undercover in 1904 to document squalid conditions in Chicago’s meatpacking plants, leading to his muckraking novel The Jungle.

    His reporting led to new public health laws two years later.

    In today’s social media world, Upton’s expose would have gone viral.

    Sure, we would have lost a classic book, but just consider the retweets.
    That possibility unsettles some in the agriculture industry.

  • Tired of budget shenanigans? Here’s the answer

    By LEE HAMILTON
    Center on Congress
    With the formal release of President Obama’s budget, the pieces are finally in place for a reprise of the Washington drama we’ve all come to know.

    There will be high-stakes negotiations, lines in the sand, and enough intrigue to keep Beltway insiders riveted by every piece of breaking news.

    The rest of us, though, are already worn out. In repeated conversations with ordinary people, I’ve been struck by the immense frustration I’ve encountered.

  • Not your average model train

    A large model train constructed by late Oliver Springs resident Staples Cross recently made a long trip home from South Carolina

    What’s so special about it?

    “The mudflaps, everything, is made out of wood,” said Pat Crowe. Cross is believed to have spent 400 hours making the train.

    Dorothy Kelly, the wife of Cross’ nephew Billy Kelly, decided to donate the train to the Oliver Springs Historical Society upon her husband’s death.

  • Did you know

    ... that while Roane State is well-respected as our local community college, Roane County once had two other institutes of higher learning?
    In Harriman

    The first was in Harriman, where what we now know as the Temperance Building was used as the part of the American Temperance University.

    In 1898, its second year, the university enrolled 345 students from 20 states.

    Believe it or not, this school is in the college football record books.

    Trust us, it’s not a good thing.