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Today's News

  • ORNL contributes oral histories, items to project focused on Oak Ridge history

    History was recently made when the Center for Oak Ridge Oral History received a donation of oral histories and other history-related materials from Oak Ridge National Laboratory to add to its growing collection.
    The center, headquartered in Oak Ridge Public Library, was established in 2009 as a partnership between the city of Oak Ridge and the U.S. Department of Energy.
    A committee of community volunteers, organizations and state and federal agencies provide advice and guidance to the city on its oral history initiative.

  • Out to Lunch: Have a taste of history with your Stagecoach meal

    By Bethel Poston

  • Overdose appears to be cause of pair’s death

    Two people found dead in a home in Rockwood on Thursday apparently died of an overdose.
    A family member discovered the bodies of Kathleen M. Webb and Michael E. Wampler at 787 Bates Street.
    “(Roane County Medical Examiner) Dr. (Bill) Bennett did come to the scene and advised he thought this was going to be ruled as the eighth and ninth overdose in Roane County this year,” the police report on the incident said.
    Wampler was 52, and Webb was 57.

  • Competitive young bowlers on a roll

    A group of youths spend many of their Saturdays honing their bowling skills at the Tri-Cities Lanes bowling alley.
    Competitive bowling might not seem like a youth sport, but at the Midtown alley it’s a popular hit.
    A look at some of the Tennessee State United States Bowling Congress Youth Association tournament scores over the years shows many bowlers from Roane County.
    Two of those talented players that frequent the alley are teammates Mikayla Letner and Joey Goss, both 16.

  • Harriman City Council candidates sound off

    A small crowd braved the chilly wind to hear candidates for Harriman City Council at Killefer Park recently.
    Three incumbents — council members Kenyon Mee, Lonnie Wright and Ken Mynatt — and three-time contender Luther Manning, shared common ground on many issues but one.
    They disagree on the city-manager form of government.

    Mynatt was the biggest advocate and credits that style of managing the city with getting rid of the “good-old-boy” network.

  • Ties that bind

    Rainbows of color adorn many a student at Oliver Springs High School.
    The source is the school’s resource officer, Roane County Sheriff Office’s Steve Sanders, who for several years has braided the nylon strings into patterned bands for students and faculty.
    He started giving them to students who saw him making the bracelets, and Sanders said it is a great icebreaker with timid students at the school.
    He likes to help students struggling with acclimating to a new school.

  • Kids’ Cafe means food, fun

    The Second Harvest Food Bank’s Kids’ Cafe is a bright spot at Rockwood Housing Authority.
    Since it opened a few months ago, many children from the Evans Heights neighborhood have been going there to enjoy food and have fun every Wednesday from 5-7 p.m.
    Recently, they indulged in hamburgers and salads, while drawing “what home means to me,” and submitting them as entries to the Housing Authority’s national calendar.

  • LOOSELEAF LAUREATE: After three days, coming down from Ozone

    By the time this prints, I will be winding up a three-week housesitting stint in Ozone.

    It’s been an interesting gig — 38 wooded acres, a gourmet kitchen, hot tub, master suite with heated tile floors.

    And, outside, multi-level decks overlooking native plant gardens.

    I would have loved to have spent more time on the wooded trails and in the hot tub, but my house-sitting also coincided with three very busy weeks in my life.

  • Harriman Mayors Race: Mason, Best face off

    Harriman’s mayoral candidates share the vision of what Harriman can be but disagree on how to get there.

    Incumbent Chris Mason is going up against Wayne Best, a former fire chief for the city.

    Early voting began on May 18.

    At a recent candidate forum in Harriman’s historic Cornstalk Heights neighborhood, the men talked about their qualifications.

  • Walnut Hill says goodbye

    Schools across the county are closing their doors for the summer.

    For Walnut Hill Elementary School in Harriman, this will be their last time.

    When the new school year rolls around, the students and faculty will join Bowers Elementary School. This change spurs mixed feelings for the Walnut Hill community.

    “I think it’s going to be a great thing,” said principal Kevin Ayers. “From some of the ones (students) I’ve talked to, they’re pretty excited about it.”