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Today's News

  • Beets elected vice chair of ETHRA, ETDD

    Kingston Mayor Troy Beets was elected vice chairman of East Tennessee Human Resource Agency and East Tennessee Development District during the agencies’ annual meetings in Knoxville.

    Beets, elected by unanimous consent of the board, will take office on July 1.

    Other officers elected by unanimous consent during the meeting in Rothchild’s Conference Center were Chairwoman Estelle Herron, Loudon County Mayor; Secretary Bill Brittain, Hamblen County Mayor; and Treasurer Jeff Tibbals, Scott County Mayor.

  • Going green in the literal sense

    Dakota Thompson of the Rockwood High School softball team boasts green hands, and streaks of green on her arms and face, for a worthy cause at Mike “Brillo” Miller Sportspark.

    She and her teammates — along with members of the school’s baseball team — spent a recent Saturday sprucing up the park for its busy spring and summer seasons.

    Others participating in the workday include softball and baseball parents, volunteers, city of Rockwood and its public works department and Rockwood Electric Utility.

  • Rabies clinics slated

    Roane County Health Department is sponsoring a series of rabies vaccination clinics later this month throughout the county.

    “You are urged to have your dogs and cats vaccinated each year to comply with the Tennessee Rabies Law,” said Preston Woody, environmental health specialist at the Roane County Health Department.

    Vaccinations are $12 each. All dogs and cats 3 months and older are required by law to be vaccinated.

  • Look Back: A Litte Something From Our Files From the Week of April 8

    25 Years Ago

  • The Garden Gate: Hard to believe what it takes for a good cup of joe

    There are so many different kinds of gardening.

    There’s something for everyone — take your choice among them all.

    We have barrier-free gardening and defensive gardening. Therapeutic gardening and hydroponic gardening. Organic gardening, and probably a lot more.

    Genetic gardening is one of the newest and most rapidly expanding ones.

  • Vocalists Staton, Van Horn to be featured at RSCC recital

    Roane State Community College students Rebecca Staton and Mason Van Horn will be featured during the college’s sophomore recital at 6:30 p.m. April 12 in downtown Harriman’s Princess Theatre.

    Staton, a mezzo-soprano, and tenor Van Horn will perform classical and musical theater selections, including duets, with faculty pianists Geol Greenlee and Slade Trammell.

    Admission is free.

  • Avery Elise Fritz

    Avery Elise Fritz of Kingston celebrated her 10th birthday Feb. 1 with friends and family at Coolsports the Icearium, Farragut.

    She is the daughter of Matt and Angie Thomas Fritz, Kingston.

    Grandparents are Jim and Becky Moates Thomas, Kingston, and Ernest and Cynthia Fritz, Harrison.

    Great-grandmothers are Madeline Moates, Rockwood, and Betty Pratt, Urbana, Ohio.

    Avery has a 7-year-old sister, Braxton Olivia.

  • Mr. & Mrs. Duff 50th

    John Raymond and Linda Duff of the Paint Rock community will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on April 19.

    They will celebrate with family and oldest granddaughter, Codi, in her wedding to Stefen Mitchell.

    The Duffs were married on April 19, 1963, in Illinois. They moved in 1976 to the Philadelphia/Paint Rock area, where they raised their daughters, Deneen Heuer of Clarksville and Bridget Duff of Paint Rock.

    They have three grandchildren: Codi and Steffi Heuer of Clarksville, and Breeharra Duff of Paint Rock.

  • OUR OPINION: Disappointment over rejection of ankle bracelets

    It’s a shame the Roane County Commission failed the taxpayers on a potential resource — ankle bracelets — to save taxpayers some revenue while expanding our arsenal to deal with nonviolent crime.

    We’d like to give a nod to the commissioners who voted Monday in favor of the measure, which would have allocated $25,000 for an ankle-bracelet monitoring program.

    The commissioners who stuck their necks out in an effort to save taxpayers some money were Copper Bacon, James Brummett, Randy Ellis, Jerry Goddard, Chris Johnson and Fred Tedder.

  • Political parties need to put on big-boy pants

    By LEE HAMILTON
    Center on Congress
    A few weeks ago, the Republican National Committee issued a 100-page report aimed at reviving the GOP after its poor showing in last November’s elections. It was remarkably blunt about the specifics of the party’s shortcomings — its lack of inclusiveness, its hapless data initiatives, its poor grassroots organizing.

    What it did not take on, however, was an issue the RNC can do little about: the diminished influence, if not irrelevance, of both major parties in American politics.