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Today's News

  • Blood drives in Harriman, Kingston

    Medic Regional Blood Center hopes that blood donation is on top of the list for New Year’s Resolutions.

    “If all donors gave just one more donation per year, our area would rarely experience a blood shortage,” said Christi  Fightmaster, Medic’s director of public relations.    

    Medic is the sole provider of blood for 21 counties and 27 area hospitals throughout the greater East Tennessee region.   

  • Plan ahead to prevent being a statistic this New Year's holiday

    As Americans prepare for holiday celebrations, AAA reminds both drivers and passengers of the dangers on the roads on New Year’s Day.

    According to AAA, New Year’s Day consistently ranks as the day most alcohol-related fatalities occur.

    To strengthen efforts to protect the public against drunk drivers and reduce alcohol-related traffic deaths, AAA supports ignition interlocks for all convicted DUI offenders and offers important safety advice to partygoers.

  • Veterans nursing home option?

    Harriman Mayor Chris Mason is optimistic about the potential after his visit with the Veterans Administration to talk about turning the soon-to-be abandoned Roane Medical Center facility in downtown Harriman into a veterans hospital.
    “The meeting overall was a success, and I left them with an invitation to travel here and see the building and also let them know that we were open to the idea of them utilizing it for other things,” Mason said.

  • Seth moves on from mayor to emcee role

    Midtown Elementary’s Seth Gunter, 11, is articulate, clearly intelligent and thoughtful.
    It’s why he was selected to emcee the Junior Achievement Awareness Breakfast to benefit Junior Achievement of Tennessee. Seth was “discovered” while participating with other Midtown Elementary School fifth graders in Junior Achievement’s Biztown — the interactive mock town where students fill a variety of roles in a community.

  • EPA’s top administrator calling it quits soon

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson announced her resignation on Thursday.
    In a prepared statement, she said she will be leaving her post after the president’s state of the union address.
    “I will leave the EPA confident the ship is sailing in the right direction, and ready in my own life for new challenges, time with my family and new opportunities to make a difference,” Jackson said.

  • Life insurance argument escalates to death threat

    An argument over life insurance money had a man allegedly threatening to take a life.
    James West, 43, was charged with aggravated assault in the incident.
    According to the warrant, West and Shella Stafford got into an argument over life insurance money on Dec. 18.
    “Ms. Stafford states that the defendant became angry, shoved her, slammed the door and would not let her leave,” the warrant said. “The defendant grabbed a shotgun  and put it to her head and said, ‘You are gonna die (expletive).”

  • Tamke Allen hosts STEM workshop

    Grade 4-8 teachers from Roane, Union, Scott, Campbell and Morgan counties recently visited Roane State Community College’s Tamke-Allan Observatory and were taught helpful strategies for teaching science topics.
    Educators at all levels are concerned with increasing student interest and achievement in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields.

  • Looseleaf Laureate by Terri Likens - Plot twist: A later-in-life love story

    My father died around six years ago.
    Since then, life has been pretty lonely for my mother.
    Sure, she had her ladies lunch groups and some neighbors she sometimes spends time with.
    And there’s me. I live a bit more than an hour away, but that’s a couple hours closer than any of my siblings.
    However, I have been spending more time with my boyfriend — and so Mom’s and my visits have been more limited.

  • Resolutions, sure, but why be so formal?

    Jan. 1 looms.
    Many of us are stuffed full from Christmas treats and are already planning how to shed some extra weight.
    We’re also promising ourselves we’ll finally clean out the basement, get more organized, get out of debt and paint that hall — the one with six doorway frames that will all need special attention.
    In other words, we have started on our New Year’s resolutions.
    Just talking about New Year’s resolutions makes some of us weary.

  • We’re really looking for more bang for tax dollars

    By LEE HAMILTON
    We are locked in a seemingly permanent debate over the proper size and scope of government. It was a centerpiece of the recent presidential campaign.
    It features heavily in the ongoing maneuvering over the “fiscal cliff” and the upcoming vote on raising the debt ceiling.
    And it surfaces regularly in the speeches and comments of politicians and opinion leaders who either take the government to task for growing too large or argue that it needs to play an even more active role than it does now.