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Today's News

  • No frills? Not at this soccer camp
  • Boys and Girls Club ends first season successfully

    Barefoot children busily color with sidewalk chalk outside while a pair of young girls sing at a piano in the gymnasium.

    Exuberant children fill the Boys & Girls Club in Harriman, which is nearing the end of its summer program. It opened to all school-age children in the Harriman area this summer.

    “It has been going great,” said Reggie Coleman, site director. “The kids are doing well.”

    The program’s goal is to provide children a safe refuge for the summer at a price parents can afford

    Eric Parrott made plenty of friends through the program.

  • Wimmer dies in farming accident

    A former Harriman orthodontist and Harriman Lions Club stalwart died after an accident at his farm.

    Bill Wimmer, 88, of Oakdale, had been working on his farm last Tuesday, July 15, and was putting his tractor-pulled brush mower in the barn at day’s end when he became trapped by it.

    He was calling for help when friends and family found him hours later and was taken to University of Tennessee Medical Center.

    “When we found him, he was talking and laughing a little bit,” said Joe Williams, a fellow Lions Club member and dentist.

  • Alleged burglars ‘friends’ of victim

    Kingston police arrested a Knoxville man and woman for allegedly attempting to break into an apartment on North Kentucky Street Monday.

    “It was approximately 9 o’clock this (Monday) morning,” Kingston Police Chief Jim Washam said.

    Tiffany Nicole Long, 30, and Kyle Thomas Myers, 25, are each charged with aggravated burglary. Police said Leroy Brummett called 911 and said someone was breaking into his apartment.

  • McFarland loans campaign $75k

    How bad does Tom McFarland want to be circuit court judge?

    Enough to loan his campaign $75,000. According to his second-quarter campaign financial disclosure report, he did just that on June 18.

    McFarland’s contributions from individuals during the period totaled $2,000.

    John Valliant Jr., a Knoxville attorney, donated $1,000 of that.

    McFarland faces Mike Pemberton in the race for circuit court judge of the 9th Judicial District. Russell E. Simmons Jr., the current judge, is retiring on Aug. 31.

  • Score not important in scrimmages

     It has been nearly nine months since Roane County’s five high schools teams have played a game that matters, but Friday evening all five teams will take a big step in preparing for the 2014 season as all will participate in their first full contact scrimmages of the fall.

  • Jobless rate up in June

    Roane County’s unemployment rate continued to climb in June, when it reached almost 1 percent over May’s figures to settle at 7.2 percent.

    The trend was not uncommon statewide — according to figures released late last week by the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, all 95 counties in Tennessee had increasing unemployment rates during the month.

    Roane County’s rate, however, is still significantly lower than for the same period last year. The county’s rate in June 2013 was 8.7 percent.

  • K-25 demolition work, tasks finished

    Demolition of the K-25 Building at East Tennessee Technology Park ended late last year, but that was not the end of the project.

    Many other tasks had to be accomplished before the project could be officially declared complete.

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s cleanup contractor, URS/CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, popularly known as UCOR, has now completed those tasks safely and ahead of schedule.

  • Efforts expanded to uncover employer fraud

    The Workers’ Compensation Division of the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development has put into place new procedures to identify employers who engage in payroll fraud.

    These types of fraud include intentionally misclassifying workers as independent contractors, failing to report all wages paid, misrepresenting the kind of work performed, or paying workers “under the table.”

    These practices are typically used to avoid paying workers’ compensation and unemployment insurance tax premiums.

  • Project deemed ‘excellent’ by nuclear society

    The successful demolition of a former gaseous diffusion facility has been honored by the American Nuclear Society.

    The American Nuclear Society’s Decommissioning and Environmental Services Division selected the K-25 demolition project to receive its Project Excellence Award.

    The K-25 building at East Tennessee Technology Park was built as part of the Manhattan Project in the 1940s. As the massive, mile-long building began deteriorating, its demolition was considered one of the highest priorities for the environmental cleanup program in Oak Ridge.