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Today's News

  • Fulton ends Kingston’s season

    The Kingston Lady Jackets magical run into the postseason ended Monday night with a 55-47 loss to the Fulton Falcons in the Region 2AA semifinals at Austin-East  High School.
    Janae Fugua and Keke McKinney tallied 17 and 16 points, respectively, for the Falcons. McKinney had 11 rebounds with six steals.
    Gianna Manfredi led Kingston with 13 points, two rebounds and two assists, while Hannah added a double-double (10 points, 10 rebounds) with two assists and one steal.

  • Utility worker racks up DUI in HUB truck

    A Harriman Utility Board employee has been charged with driving under the influence after rear-ending a vehicle and fleeing the scene in one of the utility’s trucks on Saturday.

    Kim Trent Harmon, 61, 150 Turner Drive, was also charged with leaving the scene (property damage only) and following too closely. He was booked into the Roane County Jail that evening.

    “HUB has had no knowledge of any irregularities while Mr. Harmon has been on duty,” HUB Manager Bill Young said. “He was suspended without pay until further notice.”

  • Student teacher charged with contacting minor

    A man who worked as a student teacher at Oliver Springs High School is accused of making inappropriate online contact with a student.

    Travis Lee Tucker, 32, was indicted by the Roane County grand jury last week on two counts of solicitation of a minor.

    According to a report filed in the case, Oliver Springs High School Principal Justin Nivens notified authorities about the allegations last year.

  • Back in charge: Stinnett again police chief

    A familiar face is back as Rockwood police chief.

    Former chief Bill Stinnett, who remained with the department after taking a step back from the department’s top post in 2013, was appointed to the vacancy at the Rockwood City Council meeting on Monday.

    Mayor Mike “Brillo” Miller said Stinnett was chief when he first took office as mayor.

    “I think he does an outstanding job,” Miller said. “He’s honest. He works hard.”

  • Longtime Harriman library director Milsaps laid to rest

    Longtime Harriman Public Library Director Barbara Pelfrey Milsaps died Friday at 57.

    Milsaps was devoted to the Harriman Public Library, a historic Carnegie library that was among those funded by entreprenuer Andrew Carnegie.

    Milsaps joined the library staff at only 16. She served as children’s librarian before being named director.

    She retired in 2014, but many said the library would always be known as “Barbara’s Library.”

    Mayor Wayne Best said Milsaps had been a part of Harriman as long as he could remember.

  • Tardiness voids plea deal on Swan Pond cemetery vandalism

    A deal to resolve the Swan Pond Baptist Church cemetery theft and vandalism case didn’t go forward as planned Tuesday morning.

    Assistant District Attorney General Bob Edwards said the agreement was scuttled after defendant Kevin Delaney Limburg didn’t show up on time for his plea hearing at the Roane County Courthouse.

    “We’re pretty unhappy with Mr. Limburg right now,” Edwards said.

  • 18-year-olds charged in sex crime case

    The Roane County grand jury returned a superseding indictment last week in a sex crime case.

    Jack Martin Hornbeck was originally indicted last year on one count of attempted aggravated rape when he was 17.

    Hornbeck is now 18 and the new indictment charges him and another 18-year-old, Houstin Layne Longmire.

    Hornbeck is charged with attempted aggravated rape, aggravated rape, attempted rape, and facilitation of rape. Longmire is charged with attempted aggravated rape, aggravated rape and rape.

    The crimes allegedly occurred on Oct. 3, 2015.

  • PROPERTY TAX TIME
  • From the EDITOR’S Desk: What took you all so long?

    It’s now clear that of all the stories that will grace the pages of the Roane County News this year probably none will be more controversial than that of school consolidation.

    A couple of weeks ago, I would have given the honor of most controversial issue to the aquatic weed problem, which is either a problem or not a problem, depending on who you ask, but is certainly controversial.

  • GLIMPSES: When did ‘facts’ replace facts?

    By Mark Banker

    Whatever your take on the new presidential administration, give them credit. They have added a few new terms and renewed zest to our political discourse.

    Take, for example, Kellyanne Conway’s notion of “alternative facts” or the new president’s repeated tweets about “fake news” and the “enemy media.”

    These phrases echo the disparaging rhetoric about “political correctness” that became a rallying point for conservatives in recent years.